• Stevie Wonder takes both knees 'for America'

    Trump criticized some in the NFL on Friday night at a rally in Alabama, saying team owners should fire players for taking a knee during the national anthem. His remarks appeared to refer to Colin Kaepernick -- formerly with the San Francisco 49ers, but currently without a team -- who last year drew national attention for refusing to stand during "The Star-Spangled Banner" prior to kickoff. "I am not going to stand up to show pride in a flag for a country that oppresses black people and people of color," Kaepernick said last year. Trump is responding a year later, saying if fans would "leave the stadium" when players kneel in protest during the national anthem, "I guarantee, things will stop."

  • The enduring appeal of Audrey Hepburn

    More than 50 years after her iconic turn as Holly Golightly in Breakfast at Tiffany's, Audrey Hepburn's style is attracting the attention of a new generation of fashion lovers. A collection of the actress's little black dresses, trench coats and a sleeping mask are among thousands of personal items on display at Christie's in central London. Almost 500 lots are to be sold in the coming weeks, but it was not only potential buyers browsing the auction house as the exhibition opened on Saturday. A younger generation - many born after Hepburn's death nearly 25 years ago - are turning out to see the clothes worn by the 20th Century muse. Adrian Hume-Sayer, director of private collections at Christie's,

  • The famed painters who vanished into obscurity

    Two exhibitions open this month devoted to a group of working class artists from the East End of London who became art world celebrities in the late 1920s and 1930s - only to be forgotten after World War Two. They were known as the East London Group, and among their ranks were humble office clerks, a navvy, a window cleaner, a shop assistant, a printer, a basket-weaver and an errand boy. Now they're being rediscovered, with one exhibition devoted to their work in Southampton, and another, curated by the children's author Michael Rosen and radio producer Emma-Louise Williams, on their home turf of Bow in East London. Though they had no formal art school training, the paintings they produced were

  • 'Lost' Rubens discovered after 400 years

    A "lost" portrait by Flemish artist Peter Paul Rubens has been rediscovered after almost 400 years. The 17th Century Flemish artist's "head study" of the Duke of Buckingham was identified by Dr Bendor Grosvenor from BBC Four's Britain's Lost Masterpieces. It was in Glasgow Museums' collection and on public display at the city's Pollok House stately home. But overpainting and centuries of dirt meant it was thought to be a later copy by another artist. The restored portrait of George Villiers, the 1st Duke of Buckingham, was authenticated as a Rubens by Ben van Beneden, director of the Rubenshuis in Antwerp. He said it was a "rare addition to Rubens's portrait oeuvre, showing how he approached

  • Sports media gets political after Trump's NFL comments

    ESPN abandoned its usual pregame chatter in favor of a long and heavy conversation about unity, politics and President Trump. Fox and CBS said they would broadcast the national anthem live -- a notable shift away from the usual practice. Make no mistake: Sports TV became political on Sunday in a whole new way. It would have been nearly impossible for sports broadcasters to ignore the story. Trump kicked off a firestorm two days ago when he criticized the National Football League and attacked athletes who kneel during the national anthem to draw attention to social justice issues. "Wouldn't you love to see one of these NFL owners, when somebody disrespects our flag, to say, 'Get that son of a

  • Olympic champion 'cut herself daily'

    Olympic champion Dame Kelly Holmes has spoken of how she self-harmed as she struggled to overcome injuries she thought would end her career. Dame Kelly, who lives in Kent, won gold in the 800m and 1,500m competitions in Athens in 2004. She said just a year earlier she was "cutting" herself regularly "to release the anguish" she experienced. Dame Kelly said: "At my lowest, I was cutting myself with scissors every day that I was injured." She opened up about her experience with depression at the new Health and Wellbeing Live show near Tonbridge on Saturday. At the event, Dame Kelly shared an image taken immediately after an injury during the world championships in 1997. It was one of seven injuries

  • Exclusive: NFL airing unity ad in prime time on Sunday

    With President Trump taking aim at the NFL and its players who protest during the national anthem, the league is broadcasting a message of unity. The NFL is dusting off a one-minute ad that it produced for the Super Bowl earlier this year. It was originally made to "demonstrate the power of football to bring people together," the league said. So the NFL is going to run the ad again on NBC's "Sunday Night Football" telecast on Sunday. The decision was finalized on Sunday morning. "We think this is the single best response to demonstrate what we are about," an NFL spokesman told CNN. "It stands in stark contrast to some who practice the politics of division." The idea is to take the high road --