• Tributes are paid to MTV reality star Clay Adler, who's died aged 27

    US reality star Clay Adler has died aged 27. Clay was a cast member on the MTV series Newport Harbour: The Real Orange County, and was also an actor in the TV series Make It or Break It. MTV has paid tribute to the star, who is thought to have taken his own life. "We are saddened by the news of Clay Adler's passing," it said in a statement. "Our thoughts and prayers are with his family and friends at this time." Jennifer Lawrence, who was a good friend of the star, is apparently heartbroken after hearing the news, according to Hollywood Life. According to reports, Clay shot himself while in the desert with friends on Saturday 25 March. His dad, Frank, told People magazine that his son had died

    BBC Radio 1 Newsbeat q
  • Why some Saudi women prefer to remain unmarried

    Samar Al-Muqrin Al-Jazira It is strange that the Ministry of Economy and Planning is so male-oriented when it comes to publishing statistics. The latest statistics released by the General Statistics Authority showed that the number of unmarried women in Saudi Arabia increased to four million by the end of 2015. There were no statistics for men. The ministry portrays the issue as a problem that has only to do with women without recognizing that unmarried men are a greater problem. These statistics are released annually and they inspire TV producers and newspaper columnists looking for causes and solutions. From a male perspective, the most efficient solution is polygamy. However, this derogatorily

    Saudi Gazette q
  • North Korea threatens to sink US aircraft carrier

    In the face of recent saber-rattling from North Korea, US President Donald Trump had said the USS Carl Vinson carrier group was being deployed to waters off the Korean peninsula The location of the USS Carl Vinson has dominated headlines after Trump's remark on April 12. Trump said he was sending "an armada" to Korean waters potentially to deal with threats from North Korea. The statement came after Pyongyang said it had successfully launched a new ballistic missile. "We are sending an armada. Very powerful," Trump told Fox Business Network's Maria Bartiromo. "We have submarines. Very powerful. Far more powerful than the aircraft carrier. That I can tell you." But it turned out the carrier group

    CNN q
  • North Korea threatens to sink approaching US carrier

    North Korea threatened on Sunday to sink a US aircraft carrier cruising towards the tense Korean peninsula, and said it would strike Australia with nuclear weapons if it "blindly" followed its American ally. The latest warnings from Pyongyang came as two Japanese navy ships joined the American carrier strike group for exercises in the western Pacific. US President Donald Trump ordered the USS Carl Vinson to sail to waters off the Korean peninsula in response to rising tension over the North's nuclear and missile tests, and its threats to attack the United States and its regional allies. US Vice President Mike Pence said on Saturday that it would arrive "within days" but gave no other details.

    Al Jazeera q
  • Kylie Jenner accepts invite to be California teenager's high school prom date

    Kylie Jenner has surprised teenagers at a high school in California by turning up at their prom. The reality star was invited by student Albert Ochoa after his date turned him down. Videos posted on social media show the 19-year-old walking through crowds of people at Rio Americano High School on Saturday night. Kylie snapchatted a photo of herself in a prom dress with friend Jordyn Woods. "TELL ME WHY MY BROTHER TOOK KYLIE JENNER TO PROM 2NIGHT !!!!!!!", she wrote on Twitter. Albert retweeted videos showing him entering the prom with Kylie. Kylie attended high school until the end of ninth grade before being home schooled, and missed out on her own high school prom. She has previously talked

    BBC Radio 1 Newsbeat q
  • Last few days — Bashar Al-Assad for sale!

    Hussein Shobokshi THERE are reports of a deal being cooked up for the “salvation” of Syrian President Bashar Al-Assad. Russia or rather Putin, the protector of Assad, wants an exceptional price in exchange for giving up and agreeing to his departure. It is a political slave trade par excellence. Even Bashar Al-Assad himself cannot believe the hue and cry that is going on about his survival or departure. As it is well known, Assad was not the first choice of his father to be the president of Syria. His brother, Basil, was the favorite for that position, and he was prepared and reformed politically and militarily in the media but died in mysterious and dubious circumstances, which was later described

    Saudi Gazette q
  • India divided

    In normal circumstances Indian playback singer Sonu Nigam’s objection to the adhan (the call to prayer) would have been ignored on Twitter as yet another diatribe by yet another fading celebrity to revive his stardom. Time and again in the past, objections have been raised from several quarters including some Muslims with regard to the use of loudspeakers for the adhan or to the gathering of Muslims on the street for Friday prayers. In the same breadth, although somewhat muted, there have been objections about the use of loudspeakers in late-night Jagrata (a night of Hindu religious singing) and the disruption of life in Mumbai during the Ganpati festival. India has always lived with its rich ethos of tolerance and respect for all faiths.

    Saudi Gazette q
  • Little Mix win best global act at Kids' Choice Awards

    Little Mix gave a shout out to their fans after their win at the Kids' Choice Awards (KCA). The British girl group won the favourite global music star award in Los Angeles. They performed their hit single Shout Out To My Ex and a version of their song Touch during the ceremony. Collecting their award, Perrie Edwards said: "You're the best fans in the world. We love you more than anything." Other winners of the night included Fifth Harmony, who picked up an award for favourite music group and Shawn Mendes, who won favourite male singer. Selena Gomez took home the award for favourite female singer. The Nickelodeon Kids' Choice awards are famous for soaking celebrities in green slime - and this

    BBC Radio 1 Newsbeat q
  • Philippines shuts down mining operations

    The environment agency in the Philippines has cancelled at least 70 large-scale mining contracts. The government says it is stepping up its campaign to stop extraction in what it describes as “critical areas” in the south of the country. But many people from the mining industry, who fear for their livelihoods, have opposed the decision. Al Jazeera's Jamela Alindogan reports from Compostela Valley, in the southern Philippines.

    Al Jazeera q
  • Qatar Airways chief accuses US carriers of ‘bullying’

    DUBAI: The chief of Qatar Airways on Monday accused American carriers complaining over alleged subsidies to Gulf airlines of “bullying,” as he announced new US routes in defiance of mounting airport restrictions. US carriers Delta, United and American Airlines have accused Qatar Airways along with Dubai’s Emirates and Abu Dhabi’s Etihad of benefitting from government subsidies to expand their transcontinental networks. They have urged US President Donald Trump to take action against the Gulf airlines, who deny any form of subsidy. Speaking to reporters at the annual Arabian Travel Market in Dubai, Qatar Airways chief Akbar Al-Baker said he didn’t expect any action from Washington. “President

    Arab News q
  • IS linked Abu Sayyaf with US bounty wants to surrender

    MANILA: An elderly, one-armed leader of the Islamic State-linked Abu Sayyaf group has indicated via an emissary that he wants to surrender to the Philippine authorities and is tired of being on the run, an army general said yesterday. Brigadier-General Cirilito Sobejana, army commander on the Abu Sayyaf stronghold of Jolo island, said he has met an emissary who was seeking to negotiate the surrender of Radullan Sahiron, who is more than 70 years old and wanted by the United States for the kidnapping of Western tourists 17 years ago. The Philippines has deployed nearly 10,000 soldiers on southern Jolo to try to wipe out Abu Sayyaf as its bloody campaign of piracy and kidnapping intensifies.

    Kuwait Times q
  • Chinese jihadis’ rise in Syria raises concerns at home

    BEIRUT: Many don’t speak Arabic and their role in Syria is little known to the outside world, but the Chinese fighters of the Turkistan Islamic Party in Syria are organized, battled-hardened and have been instrumental in ground offensives against President Bashar Assad’s forces in the country’s northern regions. Thousands of Chinese jihadis have come to Syria since the country’s civil war began in March 2011 to fight against government forces and their allies. Some have joined the Al-Qaeda’s branch in the country previously known as Nusra Front. Others paid allegiance to the Daesh group and a smaller number joined factions such as the ultraconservative Ahrar Al-Sham. But the majority of Chinese

    Arab News q
  • Russia bans Jehovah’s Witnesses

    Russia's Supreme Court has ruled Jehovah's Witnesses an "extremist" group. This will effectively shut the organisation down at the national and regional level, and the government will seize their assets. Al Jazeera’s Rory Challands reports from Moscow.

    Al Jazeera q
  • Egypt Named Among World's 32 Most Powerful Economies From Now Until 2050 by PricewaterhouseCoopers

    Business Insider UK has named Egypt among the 32 most powerful economies by 2030, citing a PricewaterhouseCoopers (PwC) report titled ‘The Long View: How Will the Global Economic Order Change by 2050?’ The predictions are based on these countries’ projected GDP by purchasing power parity (PPP) by 2030. China leads the pack with a projected GDP by PPP of $38 trillion, with the US coming as a distant second at $23 trillion, and Egypt ranks 19th with a projected GDP by PPP of $2 trillion.According to the PwC report, Egypt’s economy will grow at an average rate of 5% between 2016 and 2020. The country’s GDP by PPP is projected to reach $4.3 trillion, and its population is estimated to grow to 151.1

    cairoscene.com q
  • Week in pictures: 15-21 April 2017

    Our selection of some of the most striking news photographs taken around the world this week. All photographs are copyrighted.

    BBC News q
  • Zayn Malik defends Gigi Hadid after 'racist' Snapchat video

    Zayn Malik has defended his girlfriend Gigi Hadid in a single tweet after her sister Bella posted a Snapchat video of her. In it, Gigi holds up a Buddha-shaped cookie, squints her eyes and smiles. Bella has since deleted it after fans called the model racist against Asians. But it's still been widely shared online. Critics were keen to highlight Zayn's Asian heritage, prompting him to defend her. After being questioned by fans about the video, Zayn replied to one saying: "Trust me.. she likes asians ;)". Gigi Hadid was named international model of the year at the 2016 Fashion Awards last December. But this isn't the first time she's been criticised. She had to apologise after co-hosting the American

    BBC Radio 1 Newsbeat q
  • New Biopic About Egyptian-Born Superstar Dalida Set to Premiere This Month

    The French production was released in France today, opening to critical acclaim.Dalida rose to fame after she won the Miss Egypt pageant in 1954 when she was spotted by the French director Marc de Gastyne, who persuaded her to move to Paris to pursue a career in motion pictures. The move was a kick-start to Dalida's three decade long career, in which she performed and recorded countless international hits in more than 10 languages, including Arabic, French, English, and Italian, selling more than 130 million copies worldwide, before her tragic death in 1987. In a press statement by Bernard Regnauld-Fabre, the French Ambassador to Bahrain, he said, “We welcome the news that the world premiere of Dalida will take place here in Bahrain during So French Week.” So French Week is an annual week-long celebration of French culture, held by the French Embassy in Bahrain, a tradition which started in 2013.

    cairoscene.com q
  • The Iraqi Interpreter's New Home

    1/1 Iraqis who risked their lives helping the British during the Iraq war were offered the chance to live in the UK. Yet few of them knew what awaited them and their families when they took up the opportunity to escape from Iraq and start afresh. Many were told that they would be going to Glasgow, a city they knew almost nothing about. On arrival they found themselves treated as asylum seekers, faced with the most difficult of housing conditions. The shock of finding damp and cold rooms for those with families led to a sense of betrayal. If they had risked their lives for the British, why were they being treated like that?

    BBC q
  • India’s engagement with Arab world under Modi

    As Prime Minister Narendra Modi sat beside Sheikh Mohammed bin Zayed Al-Nahyan, crown prince of Abu Dhabi, at India’s Republic Day parade on Jan. 26, he marked an unprecedented Indian diplomatic engagement with Gulf countries: Over the previous two years, Modi had visited the UAE, Saudi Arabia, Iran and Qatar, and hosted the crown prince in India in February 2016. The Gulf is already India’s principal source of energy, meeting most of the country’s oil and gas requirements. It is also India’s major economic partner, with the Gulf Cooperation Council (GCC) countries collectively in the Top 3 of India’s trade partners, the No. 1 export destination and major investment partners. The GCC is also

    Arab News q
  • The countries where people still eat cats and dogs for dinner

    The new Animal Protection Act will see anyone selling, eating or buying the animals for consumption facing fines of up to £6,500. Those found guilty of animal cruelty could also receive a huge fine of £52,000 and two years in prison. Taiwan is the first Asian country to crack down on the practice. The new law tackles long-standing cultural beliefs about the benefits of eating dogs - for example, eating black dogs in winter is supposed to help you stay warm. It was pushed through by President Tsai Ing-wen, who adopted three retired guide dogs last year and also has two cats, named Cookie and A-Tsai. So what about the rest of the continent? The practice of eating cats and dogs has become less common

    BBC Radio 1 Newsbeat q