• How a botched raid led to martial law in Philippines

    MARAWI: It was meant to be a “surgical operation” to capture one of the world’s most wanted terrorists, who was hiding and wounded in a southern Philippine city. Three days later Marawi, the centre of Islam in the mainly Catholic nation was swarmed by tanks, attack helicopters and thousands of troops fighting Islamic State-linked fighters holed up in homes and buildings. President Rodrigo Duterte had also declared martial law across the southern third of the country to quell the crisis, while many of the 200,000 residents had fled… and security forces had lost their target: Isnilon Hapilon. Forces had initially been confident they would capture or kill the elusive Hapilon, regarded by the United States as one of the world’s most dangerous terrorists.

    Kuwait Times q
  • Serena Williams takes on new challenge in Silicon Valley

    Tennis star Serena Williams has joined the board at technology firm SurveyMonkey and pledged to tackle the lack of diversity in the industry. Ms Williams, who is due to marry Reddit co-founder Alexis Ohanian, said she is disappointed that high-paid tech jobs are filled by white and Asian men. It is unclear how she plans to address the issue. Tech firms based in Silicon Valley have been accused of failing to deal with sexism and a lack of diversity. "I feel like diversity is something I speak to," Williams said. "Change is always happening, change is always building. What is important to me is to be at the forefront of the change and to make it easier for the next person that comes behind me."

    BBC News q
  • Pregnant teenager banned from graduation ceremony

    A pregnant US teenager branded "immoral" by her school and barred from its graduation ceremony is to have her own event, organised by her parents. Maddi Runkles, 18, who attends a small private Christian school in Maryland, has been told she is not welcome at the event, on 2 June, because she must be "accountable for her immorality". Instead, her parents have decided to organise a special party for their daughter the following day. The decision by the board of governors of the Heritage Academy, in Hagerstown, has drawn criticism on social media from those who say the school is showing no Christian compassion to the teenager. "Heritage Academy has opportunity to demonstrate love & grace of Jesus.

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  • Here's what we know about Donald Trump's daughter Tiffany

    Donald Trump is no stranger to the limelight - and neither are his family. Daughter Ivanka is known for her many business ventures, including clothing ranges and books. And his eldest sons, Eric and Donald Jr. are businessmen, following in their father's footsteps. However, as the president's youngest daughter, Tiffany, looks to move to Washington DC this autumn for law school, we take a look at the life of the lesser-known Trump. She is the only daughter of President Trump and his second wife, actress Marla Maples, to whom he was married for six years. Tiffany grew up in California and went to school in Calabasas and boasts over one million followers on social media. This following has led to

    BBC Radio 1 Newsbeat q
  • Indian woman 'forced to marry Pakistani' returns

    An Indian woman who alleges she was forced to marry a Pakistani man at gunpoint has returned to India, a day after a court in Islamabad granted her request to leave. The woman, named only as Uzma, was escorted across the Wagah border by Indian High Commission officials. She has accused her husband, Tahir Ali, of torturing her. He denies the allegations. The incident comes amid increasing tension between India and Pakistan. On Thursday, India's Foreign Minister Sushma Swaraj tweeted, welcoming her return: Pakistani security officials escorted Uzma, who is in her early 20s, to the border crossing in the morning. She arrived in Delhi later in the day. Uzma's return comes as India and Pakistan trade

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  • ANALYSIS: Did Khamenei gamble big by playing the Raisi card?

    There is no doubt that what is known as “presidential election” in Iran is held in a very oppressive atmosphere. It is fake and totally different from democratic elections held around the world. In this fake show, only two candidates out of a total of six, are approved by Guardian Council (which is a council consisting of members selected by Khamenei). The two main selected candidates are given full media attention and coverage and political analysts turn them into election highlights.

    english.alarabiya.net q
  • Celebrities pay tribute to Manchester victims

    London (CNN)Celebrities took to Twitter to pay tribute and express their sympathy in the wake of a terror attack at an Ariana Grande concert in Manchester, England on Monday evening that left at least 22 people dead and dozens injured. Fellow singers including Katy Perry, Taylor Swift and Harry Styles were among those who tweeted their condolences.

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  • Pro-Iran, pro-terror group's comments attributed to Qatari Emir sparks GCC outrage

    Jeddah: An outpour of criticism was unleashed via social and traditional media outlets in the Gulf after the official Qatar News Agency (QNA), carried comments attributed to the nation's Emir, Sheikh Tamim bin Hamad al-Thani, said to have been made at a graduation ceremony of the national servicd (military conscription) where he has endorsed Iran, Hamas and Hezbollah. He also reportedly spoke of "tensions" with the new US administration and predicted the President Donald J. Trump will not last long, citing domestic political problems in Washington over ties with Russia. Al-Thani also seems to have praised Iran which even the previous US administration under President Obama labeled as the "biggest

    Arab News q
  • Bahrain unrest: Death toll from raid on cleric's home rises to five

    The death toll from Tuesday's raid by Bahraini police on the home of the Sunni-ruled kingdom's most prominent Shia cleric has risen to five. The interior ministry said 286 people were also arrested after officers came "under attack by members of a terrorist cell" in the village of Diraz. Activists said the officers opened fire at a sit-in by supporters of Sheikh Isa Qassim, who was not detained. It came two days after the cleric was convicted of corruption charges. Sheikh Qassim was handed a one-year suspended prison sentence and fined 100,000 Bahraini dinars ($265,000; £204,000) after being found guilty by a court of collecting funds illegally and money laundering. Last June, Bahrain stripped

    BBC News q
  • IranAir signs contract with ATR to buy 20 planes

    IranAir has signed a contract to buy 20 planes from turboprop maker ATR, Iranian deputy transport minister was quoted as saying on Monday. The deal comes after Iran, which had not directly purchased a Western-built plane in nearly 40 years, signed contracts with Europe's Airbus and US rival Boeing last year to purchase about 180 jets. That became possible after an agreement between Iran and six major powers lifted most international sanctions imposed on Tehran, in exchange for Iran curbing its nuclear program. ATR is joint-owned by France-based Airbus and Leonardo of Italy. "The contract between IranAir and ATR to buy 20 ATR 72-600 aircrafts has been signed by the officials of both countries,"

    Egypt Independent: Business q
  • Moscow Warns Turkish-Kurdish Conflict... Demands US Ariel Disengagement

    Moscow- Russia addressed tensions rising in northeastern Syria amid Turkish threats on launching a massive military offensive against Arab-Kurdish Syrian Democratic Forces who are fighting against ISIS next to the US-led international coalition. The situation in northern Syria is very likely to escalate in the near future, Russian Foreign Ministry spokeswoman Maria Zakharova said Thursday. The Syrian Democratic Forces (SDF) is an alliance of Kurdish and Arab militias that was formed in 2015, and that strives to liberate northern Syria, particularly the city of Raqqa. Zakharova also condemned US-led strikes against eastern Syria’s Tanf airbase. The US military leadership justifying the attack

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  • 'Game of Thrones' Season 7 first look

    "The dragons this year are the size of 747s," director Matt Shakman told EW. The photo shows Daenerys, played by Emilia Clarke, appearing small on the back of her dragon, which is clearly ready for war. Actor Kit Harington, who portrays Jon Snow on the series, told EW the new season will have a faster pace. "This season is really different than any other season because it's accelerating toward the end, a lot of stuff collides and happens much, much quicker than you're used to seeing on Thrones," Harington said.

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  • Pepsi and Nivea: Whose fault is it when ad campaigns go wrong?

    Marketing teams at some of the world's biggest brands haven't had the best of weeks. Pepsi faced criticism after being accused of appropriating Black Lives Matter with its Kendall Jenner ad. Nivea was also in trouble after using the slogan "white is purity" to advertise deodorant in the Middle East. We asked Lillian Sor, an executive at UK advertising agency Grey London, to explain how big marketing campaigns like these get made. Her clients include some of the country's biggest food and drink brands, along with high street shops. "We get commissioned to work by marketing directors at big brands," she explains. "They come to us with a business problem and we find a creative way to solve it."

    BBC Radio 1 Newsbeat q
  • The countries that cane their convicts

    Two men are due to be caned in public after they were caught in bed together in Aceh, Indonesia. The men will each receive 85 lashes in public, as punishment under the strict Islamic laws used in Aceh. It is the only Indonesian province where Sharia is in force. According to human rights campaign group Amnesty International, 108 people were punished for various offences in 2015. Their offences ranged from gambling to alcohol, adultery and public displays of intimacy outside of marriage. Pictures of these public punishments - designed to humiliate as much as to injure - show people being led onto a raised platform, and made to kneel or stand as a hooded man beats them with a long, thin cane while

    BBC News q
  • Hack, fake story expose real tensions between Qatar, Gulf

    Qatar said hackers allegedly broke into the website of its state-run news agency on Wednesday and published a fake story quoting the ruling emir making controversial comments. The purported fake story prompted Saudi Arabia and the United Arab Emirates to respond by blocking Qatari media, including broadcaster Al-Jazeera. The alleged hack reflects the tensions and suspicions still running deep between Qatar, whose conservative rulers have strong ties to the Muslim Brotherhood, and the UAE and Saudi Arabia, which have outlawed the group. The hack happened early on Wednesday morning and hours later, the website of the Qatar News Agency was not accessible. The hackers purportedly published what Qatari

    Egypt Independent q
  • Zayn Malik defends Gigi Hadid after 'racist' Snapchat video

    Zayn Malik has defended his girlfriend Gigi Hadid in a single tweet after her sister Bella posted a Snapchat video of her. In it, Gigi holds up a Buddha-shaped cookie, squints her eyes and smiles. Bella has since deleted it after fans called the model racist against Asians. But it's still been widely shared online. Critics were keen to highlight Zayn's Asian heritage, prompting him to defend her. After being questioned by fans about the video, Zayn replied to one saying: "Trust me.. she likes asians ;)". Gigi Hadid was named international model of the year at the 2016 Fashion Awards last December. But this isn't the first time she's been criticised. She had to apologise after co-hosting the American

    BBC Radio 1 Newsbeat q
  • Iran accuses US of 'Iranophobia'

    (CNN)Iran called on Washington on Monday to abandon its "warmongering policy, intervention, Iranophobia and sales of dangerous and useless weapons to the main sponsors of terrorism," according to state-run Press TV. Iranian Foreign Ministry spokesman Bahram Qassemi also claimed that US policy in the Middle East was destabilizing the region. Qassemi's comments come after US President Donald Trump clinched a massive $110 billion military deal with Saudi Arabia over the weekend during his first foreign trip since he took office. "From Lebanon to Iraq to Yemen, Iran funds, arms, and trains terrorists, militias, and other extremist groups that spread destruction and chaos across the region," Trump said.

    CNN q
  • Mount Everest: Bodies of four climbers found in tent

    Four climbers have been found dead inside a tent on Mount Everest, taking the death toll this season to 10. The bodies were discovered by a rescue team sent to retrieve the body of a Slovak climber who died on the mountain on Sunday. All the fatalities have occurred in or near the so-called "death zone", where oxygen levels are extremely low. Local media reported that the latest deaths were two foreign climbers and two Sherpa guides. This season has also claimed the lives of an Australian, Francesco Marchetti; an Indian, Ravi Kumar, whose body was found on Monday; and 85-year-old Min Bahadur Sherchan, who died attempting to reclaim his title as the world's oldest person to reach the top. World-renowned

    BBC News q
  • Mel B's ex strongly denies 'years of abuse'

    Mel B's estranged husband is "vehemently" denying claims he physically and emotionally abused her for years. Lawyers for Stephen Belafonte released a statement after the ex-Spice Girl was given a temporary restraining order. She claims she was the victim of "multiple physical beatings" and that her ex threatened to destroy her career by releasing a sex tape. Stephen Belafonte's legal team calls the claims "outrageous and unfounded". They say: "When the degree to which Ms Brown has gone to create a false depiction of her marriage to Mr Belafonte is uncovered, real victims and survivors of domestic violence will be understandably offended, angry and upset." What the court papers say... In detailed

    BBC Radio 1 Newsbeat q
  • 'I was forced to carry my baby, knowing she would die'

    Ashleigh Topley was four-and-a-half months pregnant when she found out her baby wouldn't survive outside the womb. "At that point, my whole world came crashing down," she tells Newsbeat. At her scan, on Valentine's Day 2013, a consultant was called in and delivered the bad news: the baby's limbs weren't growing properly and it was going to die. But because Ashleigh, then 27, lives in Northern Ireland, she was told there was nothing to be done. In the rest of the UK, women whose babies have what doctors call a "foetal abnormality" have the option of a termination. The condition is defined by NI's government as: "where death will occur before or during birth or, if a live birth should occur, there

    BBC Radio 1 Newsbeat q