• Melania interacts with Saudi female workers

    Saudi Gazette report Riyadh — US first lady Melania Trump visited GE’s all women business process service center in Riyadh on Sunday. She was accompanied by Minister of Commerce and Investment Majed Al-Qassabi. During the visit she interacted with Saudi women employees. General Electric won a prestigious award from the US State Department in recognition of its path-breaking initiative in establishing the All-Women Business Process & IT Services Center in Riyadh. The all-women center is a partnership between GE, Saudi Aramco and Tata Consultancy Services (TCS),  employing 1,000 women, 600 of them working on projects for GE. Launched in September 2013, the all-women center celebrated the milestone

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  • Trump in Riyadh: Controversy follows US president

    President Trump is one of the world's most famous Twitter users - and that fact isn't being forgotten during his trip. In addition to his main address he'll also make a short speech at a social media conference in Riyadh. And, not surprisingly, his trip itself is a major social media topic Al Jazeera's Andrew Chappelle reports on the online reaction to the visit.

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  • US sends signal to Iran: Containment is back

    US warplanes were first scrambled in a "show of force" against the oncoming convoy. But then five vehicles kept approaching, coming within 29 kilometers of the base when they were finally hit by US aircraft. The coalition confirmed that the convoy posed a direct threat to "US partner forces" -- "despite Russian attempts to dissuade pro-regime movement" toward the base. The strike marks the first time that the Pentagon has offered aerial protection to its Arab proxies under assault from pro-Syrian militias. The timing of this American escalation is noteworthy for several reasons. First, it comes just weeks after US warships in the Mediterranean fired 59 Tomahawk cruise missiles against Assad's

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  • Reema Lagoo: Bollywood's 'favourite mother' dies

    Bollywood actress Reema Lagoo, famous for playing the role of the "loving mother", has died at the age of 59. She passed away in a Mumbai hospital after suffering a cardiac arrest on Wednesday night. The actress was famous for playing the role of the mother of main characters in films and TV soaps. She also acted in several Marathi language plays. She starred in dozens of hit Bollywood films like Hum Aapke Hain Koun, Kuch Kuch Hota Hai, and Maine Pyar Kiya. Lagoo started her career in the late 1970s, and soon became famous for playing the mother of lead characters. She was also known as the "on-screen mother" of popular actor Salman Khan, with whom she acted in several films. She played Khan's

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  • Young people 'most likely to go abroad without insurance'

    About 40% of young people go abroad without travel insurance, risking medical fees of thousands of pounds if they are taken ill, a survey suggests. The Association of British Travel Agents surveyed 2,043 Britons and found those aged 18 to 24 were the most likely to go abroad without insurance. It comes after the family of a South Yorkshire traveller in Thailand had to raise £32,000 for his medical care. Overall a quarter of UK travellers are thought to go abroad without insurance. In 2015, 35-year-old Craig Lindley, from Barnsley, fell ill while celebrating a friend's wedding on a Thai island. He was diagnosed with Guillain-Barré syndrome - which affects the peripheral nervous system - and was

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  • This is what Obama told his friend about Donald Trump

    Barack Obama apparently thinks Trump is full of it. Another fun fact in the People story has to do with Malia, 18, and Sasha, 15, both of whom were apparently "sentimental" about their White House bedrooms to the point they each moved the beds into the multi-million dollar Washington home their parents are renting while Sasha completes high school at Sidwell Friends.

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  • Here's what we know about Donald Trump's daughter Tiffany

    Donald Trump is no stranger to the limelight - and neither are his family. Daughter Ivanka is known for her many business ventures, including clothing ranges and books. And his eldest sons, Eric and Donald Jr. are businessmen, following in their father's footsteps. However, as the president's youngest daughter, Tiffany, looks to move to Washington DC this autumn for law school, we take a look at the life of the lesser-known Trump. She is the only daughter of President Trump and his second wife, actress Marla Maples, to whom he was married for six years. Tiffany grew up in California and went to school in Calabasas and boasts over one million followers on social media. This following has led to

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  • Iran holds pivotal presidential elections

    Iranian voters are waiting hours in line to vote in the country's presidential election. CNN's Becky Anderson reports

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  • China claims breakthrough in mining 'flammable ice'

    China has for the first time extracted gas from an ice-like substance under the South China Sea considered key to future global energy supply. Chinese authorities have described the success as a major breakthrough. Methane hydrates, also called "flammable ice", hold vast reserves of natural gas. Many countries including the US and Japan are working on how to tap those reserves, but mining and extracting are extremely difficult. What is 'flammable ice'? The catchy phrase describes a frozen mixture of water and gas. "It looks like ice crystals but if you zoom in to a molecular level, you see that the methane molecules are caged in by the water molecules," Associate Professor Praveen Linga from

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  • Expansion of Al-Maktoum airport delayed to 2018

    DUBAI: An expansion of Dubai’s Al-Maktoum International Airport has been delayed by a year until 2018, the airport’s operator said on Wednesday. Currently Dubai’s second-largest airport, it will have the capacity to handle 26 million passengers a year when the expansion is complete. Al-Maktoum airport opened in 2013 and can currently handle about 7 million passengers a year. Its expansion has been delayed due to the completion of construction and to allow time for trials and testing, a spokesman for Dubai Airports said. The Dubai government said on Sunday that it had secured $3 billion in long-term financing for the expansion of its airports, which are forecast to serve 146.3 million passengers

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  • Yemen rebel missile shot down 200km from Saudi capital

    Yemen's Houthi rebels fired a ballistic missile towards the Saudi capital Riyadh and the Arab coalition waging war in the country said it intercepted and destroyed a projectile about 200km west of the city.  The incident on Friday occurred a day before US President Donald Trump was expected in Riyadh at the start of his first foreign trip since taking office in January. The Iran-allied Houthis launched a Burkan-1 missile toward Riyadh, a statement by their official news agency said. The Saudi-led coalition said later it downed a Houthi missile in the southern Saudi province of Ar Rayn, well to the west of Riyadh. The area is open desert and there were no casualties, the official Saudi news agency

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  • Pepsi and Nivea: Whose fault is it when ad campaigns go wrong?

    Marketing teams at some of the world's biggest brands haven't had the best of weeks. Pepsi faced criticism after being accused of appropriating Black Lives Matter with its Kendall Jenner ad. Nivea was also in trouble after using the slogan "white is purity" to advertise deodorant in the Middle East. We asked Lillian Sor, an executive at UK advertising agency Grey London, to explain how big marketing campaigns like these get made. Her clients include some of the country's biggest food and drink brands, along with high street shops. "We get commissioned to work by marketing directors at big brands," she explains. "They come to us with a business problem and we find a creative way to solve it."

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  • Pippa Middleton wedding: Bucklebury village keeps silent

    As the world's media descend on the sleepy village of Bucklebury for Pippa Middleton's wedding, its residents appear resolute in remaining tight-lipped over the whole affair, as the BBC discovered. Once in a while, a sleepy, green and quintessentially British village becomes the centre of the universe. The village is Bucklebury, in West Berkshire, and it is the home of the Middleton family. Thrown into the limelight because of the relationship and eventual marriage of daughter Catherine and the heir to throne, Prince William, the Duke and Duchess of Cambridge, it turns out the media's attention extends to all members of the clan. Pippa Middleton, the younger sister of Kate, is marrying financier

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  • 'Clock boy' discrimination case thrown out by Texas judge

    A US judge has thrown out a discrimination case brought by the family of a Muslim student whose homemade clock was mistaken for a bomb. In 2015 Ahmed Mohamed was arrested in a suburb of Dallas, Texas, after his teacher said the clock looked like an explosive device. Photos of the 14-year-old's arrest sparked a public outcry. But on Thursday a Texas judge ruled there was no evidence of racial or religious discrimination. "Plaintiff does not allege any facts from which this court can reasonably infer" that Irving Independent School District employees "intentionally discriminated" against Ahmed Mohamed, wrote US District Judge Sam Lindsay in his ruling. He also dismissed a complaint against the

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  • War with North Korea would be tragic: US military chief

    Military action on the Korean peninsula would be 'tragic on an unbelievable scale', Pentagon chief James Mattis says. US defence chief James Mattis delivered a sombre caution on North Korea, saying any military attempts to resolve the crisis would be "tragic on an unbelievable scale".   Mattis was speaking on Friday to reporters at the Pentagon, days after North Korea test-fired what analysts say was its longest-range rocket yet.     Despite tough talk from top US officials in recent weeks and the deployment of an aircraft carrier strike group to the region, Mattis said the best option for North Korea is finding an international solution to effectively apply pressure on Pyongyang.     "As you

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  • The Qatari princess, Angelina Jolie and the battle of the pyramids

    Reports that Hollywood star Angeline Jolie is planning to make a movie about Sudan's history have sparked a row with Egypt, and BBC Africa's Mohanad Hashim says it is about much more than who has the biggest pyramids. The latest twist in a long-running feud between Egyptians and Sudanese is over controversial claims that a film is to be made in Sudan to showcase the country's contribution to human civilization. Various media have reported that a Qatari production company would fund the film, which would apparently feature Hollywood stars Angelina Jolie and Leonardo Di Caprio. It is meant to promote historical tourism in Sudan by narrating the country's ancient Nubian history. The claims were

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  • General Motors will stop selling cars in India and South Africa

    General Motors is beating a retreat from one of the world's hottest car markets. The company said Thursday it will stop selling its cars in India by the end of this year, following a "comprehensive review" of plans for the country. Just two years ago, GM (GM) said it would pour $1 billion into its India operations. That plan has been scrapped as part of a bigger rethink of global operations. The company is also pulling out of South Africa. It is selling its production facilities in the country to Isuzu Motors (ISUZY) and will stop selling Chevrolet vehicles by the end of 2017. GM will continue to make cars in India for export. Vehicles made at the firm's plant near Mumbai will be exported primarily

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  • 'I was forced to carry my baby, knowing she would die'

    Ashleigh Topley was four-and-a-half months pregnant when she found out her baby wouldn't survive outside the womb. "At that point, my whole world came crashing down," she tells Newsbeat. At her scan, on Valentine's Day 2013, a consultant was called in and delivered the bad news: the baby's limbs weren't growing properly and it was going to die. But because Ashleigh, then 27, lives in Northern Ireland, she was told there was nothing to be done. In the rest of the UK, women whose babies have what doctors call a "foetal abnormality" have the option of a termination. The condition is defined by NI's government as: "where death will occur before or during birth or, if a live birth should occur, there

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  • Brazil police raid Sao Paulo 'Crackland' and make arrests

    Brazilian police have arrested nearly 40 people for drug trafficking offences in central Sao Paulo where crack cocaine has been sold and consumed freely for years. About 500 armed police officers were involved in the operation. Dozens of addicts reacted in anger, vandalising cars and looting shops. Sao Paulo's centre-right Mayor Joao Doria said the operation marked the end of impunity in the area, widely known as Cracolandia or Crackland. Critics say the move will merely push the problem to other parts of the city. Mr Doria promised to knock down many buildings and redevelop the streets near the Luz train station that have become an open-air drugs market over the past decade. "Crackland doesn't

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  • Zayn Malik defends Gigi Hadid after 'racist' Snapchat video

    Zayn Malik has defended his girlfriend Gigi Hadid in a single tweet after her sister Bella posted a Snapchat video of her. In it, Gigi holds up a Buddha-shaped cookie, squints her eyes and smiles. Bella has since deleted it after fans called the model racist against Asians. But it's still been widely shared online. Critics were keen to highlight Zayn's Asian heritage, prompting him to defend her. After being questioned by fans about the video, Zayn replied to one saying: "Trust me.. she likes asians ;)". Gigi Hadid was named international model of the year at the 2016 Fashion Awards last December. But this isn't the first time she's been criticised. She had to apologise after co-hosting the American

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