• BBC News

    Review: Network starring Bryan Cranston ★★★☆☆

    To say Ivo van Hove's stage adaptation of Paddy Chayefsky's 1976 movie Network is a bit gimmicky, would be like describing a mass murderer as a bit naughty. There are more production bells and whistles in his 119-minute (no interval) show than on one of Lady Gaga's more outré outfits. The Belgian director and his designer Jan Versweyveld have turned the National Theatre's expansive Lyttlelton stage into a shiny contemporary landscape with a massive screen acting as a backdrop for a set, divided into three principal components. They are: A glass box TV production gallery, a newsroom studio (centre-stage), and a Manhattan-style restaurant and bar (at which audience members can book a table if they're

  • BBC News

    Behind the scenes with Strictly in Blackpool

    There's a fibreglass donkey in the corridor, and someone's moving a glittery model tram across Blackpool's Tower Ballroom. Paralympian Jonnie Peacock is eating chips in the canteen with Mollie King from The Saturdays, and Holby City's Joe McFadden is looking for the physio in the rabbit warren that is the ballroom's backstage area (he'll eventually find him in a repurposed toilet cubicle). Meanwhile - past host Claudia Winkleman's dressing room and the row of clothes for the four judges - there is the thrum of sewing machines coming from the wardrobe department. Thirteen people are busy working away inside. Among them are costumiers hand-sewing tiny emerald green crystals onto a dancer's outfit.

  • CNN

    David Cassidy, 'Partridge Family' superstar, in critical condition

    (CNN)David Cassidy, the wildly popular '70s heartthrob who shot to fame when he starred and sang in TV's "The Partridge Family," is in critical condition with organ failure. Cassidy is being treated at a Fort Lauderdale, Florida, area hospital, longtime publicist Jo-Ann Geffen told CNN on Saturday. "He is conscious and surrounded by family and friends, nothing is imminent and we are taking it day by day," Geffen said. Cassidy, 67, told People magazine earlier this year he was battling dementia.

  • CNN Money

    Asian Americans: Often overlooked, they are a diverse and untapped market

    Hollywood has offered up few Asian American stars. But one of its most well-known is a cartoon: Apu from The Simpsons. Apu Nahasapeemapetilon, the Indian American character who operates the Kwik-E-Mart convenience store in the fictional town of Springfield and is known for the catch phrase "thank you, come again," has served as the animated series' running immigrant punchline for almost 30 years. "What bothered me about Apu is how he stood in for my parents, replacing their real stories and real struggles and their really complicated lives with an accent," says comedian Hari Kondabolu in his documentary The Problem with Apu, which airs Sunday on TruTV. Since there were so few Indian Americans

  • CNN

    AC/DC co-founder and guitarist Malcolm Young dies at 64

    "Renowned for his musical prowess Malcolm was a songwriter, guitarist, performer, producer and visionary who inspired many," the statement said. "From the outset, he knew what he wanted to achieve and, along with his younger brother, took to the world stage giving their all at every show. Nothing less would do for their fans."

  • CNN Money

    'Justice League' looks to its biggest heroes for box office success

    Warner Bros.' DC Entertainment is bringing out all its stars for this weekend's comic book mash-up, "Justice League." But will audiences embrace the superhero squad at the box office the way they flocked to this summer's "Wonder Woman?" So far the answer seems to be maybe. The film, which has Ben Affleck's Batman and Gal Gadot's Wonder Woman fighting alongside other DC crusaders like Erza Miller's The Flash, Jason Momoa's Aquaman, and Ray Fisher's Cyborg, brought in $13 million in preview showings on Thursday night. That's not bad, but "Wonder Woman" brought in $11 million for its Thursday night screenings, and that film wasn't packed with superheroes. "Wonder Woman" ultimately raked in $103

  • CNN

    Jeff Ross uses comedy to tackle immigration

    "If you compare what's referred to as Fake News with comedy, it can only be called Real Comedy. There's no faking it in comedy," he said. "It's either funny or not funny and funny is always based on truth." That's the reason, Ross says, that "woke comedy" or "activist comedy" is on the rise. It's an opportunity for unfiltered truths, delivered as palatable jokes. Jokes make the truth go down easier, if you will. In the special, which primarily includes footage from his time in Brownsville, Texas, a town on the frontline of the immigration debate, Ross dives into an issue that remains front of mind for many as the Trump administration takes steps to reform U.S. immigration policies. In September,