• Iran arrests woman who sneaked into Azadi stadium dressed as a man

    A young woman dressed in men’s clothing was arrested by security forces in Tehran's Azadi Stadium during a football match between Esteghlal and Al-Ein teams. Access to football stadiums has been forbidden for women since the Islamic revolution in 1979, on the official basis that the ruling protects them from obscene behavior among male fans. Young women have been caught and arrested on numerous occasions before for attempting to enter the stadiums disguised in men's outfit. Women have been unable to purchase tickets to volleyball matches in Iran since 2012.

    english.alarabiya.net q
  • What Bin Laden documents reveal about his relations with Qatar

    The US administration has decided to speak out about Qatar’s relations with terrorism in the Middle East as the White House’s new administration tries to calm the situation and control the growing terrorism on the international level. During his visit to the Middle East, US Defense Secretary James Mattis, warned Qatari officials about their country’s continued support to the Muslim Brotherhood and other radical Islamic movements that are linked to extremist organizations such as al-Qaeda and ISIS.

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  • Afghan star burns controversial dress

    An Afghan singer and television personality has publicly burned a skin-coloured dress after religious figures and members of the public criticised her for wearing it during a recent concert. Aryana Sayeed uploaded a video to her Facebook page, showing the contentious outfit going up in flames after it caused uproar in her native Afghanistan. The controversial tight dress, which she wore at a concert in Paris on 13 May, sparked condemnation from religious figures and on social media, with several people saying it was against Afghan culture and non-Islamic. She was certainly not pleased to be burning the dress, telling her more than 1.6m followers "If you think that the only problem in Afghanistan

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  • Inside the Philippines' 'baby factory'

    In the Philippines, one in 10 teenagers aged 15-19 are already mothers, according to the UN. While across the world teen pregnancy rates have been going down, in the Philippines it is growing rapidly. Dr Jose Fabella Memorial Hospital in Manila has one of the world's largest maternity wards, known as the 'baby factory', with an unusually high proportion of young mothers. Hear more on The Compass from BBC World Service.

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  • Indian woman forced to marry Pakistani at gunpoint returns home

     National rallying cry against arch-rival Pakistan NEW DELHI: An Indian woman who said she was forced to marry a Pakistani at gunpoint returned to India yesterday after a court ordered her release. Uzma Ahmad was reunited with her family at the Wagah border crossing near Amritsar in northern Punjab state before heading to New Delhi where she called on Foreign Minister Sushma Swaraj. The case became a national rallying cry against arch-rival Pakistan with Swaraj calling Ahmad “India’s daughter” and leaving no stone unturned for her release. “I want to thank the foreign ministry and the home ministry of Pakistan. If Uzma is with us today, they have a role too,” Swaraj told reporters in Delhi in

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  • ANALYSIS: Hezbollah and Qatar – a story of forbidden love?

    The emir of Qatar, Sheikh Tamim bin Hamad al-Thani, described Lebanon’s Hezbollah as a resistance movement. He was quoted by the Qatar News Agency saying that it is “not wise” to be hostile to Iran, Hezbollah’s biggest sponsor. Sheikh Hamad Al Thani visiting Lebanon. (Supplied) A billboard in Lebanon saying 'thank you Qatar.' (Supplied) Last Update: Saturday, 27 May 2017 KSA 11:50 - GMT 08:50

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  • Why India wants Justin Bieber to say Sorry

    Justin Bieber's first ever concert in India was one of the most-hyped of the year - and not just for Beliebers. But many of the 56,000 people who crammed into Mumbai's DY Patil Stadium for the Purpose tour were seriously disappointed. The Canadian popstar didn't even try to hide his lip synching, even wiping his mouth with a towel mid-song. His casual shorts and T-shirt also went down badly among some, who had expected him to make more of an effort. Fans spent between Rs 5,000 (£60) to Rs 75,000 (£906) on tickets and were seriously excited about seeing the 23-year-old live for the first time. Despite being home to 1.3 billion people, India isn't on most global megastars' list of countries to

    BBC Radio 1 Newsbeat q
  • The future of oil jobs in the Middle East

    The Organisation of Petroleum Exporting Countries (OPEC) and 11 other oil-producing nations have extended oil production cuts until March 2018 in an attempt to drain the global oversupply of oil and prop up the price of crude. Saudi Arabia led the push to extend the curbs, but oil prices have risen less than OPEC countries have hoped for. And that's because oil at current prices is enough to bring US producers back into the market. What will OPEC's production cut extension mean for energy jobs in the region? Cian Brennan from the consultants Turner and Townsend looks at what changes are coming for the Middle East's oil industry. Also on this episode of Counting the Cost: Food trends: How is our

    Al Jazeera q
  • Manchester attack: CCTV shows bomber before arena blast

    CCTV images showing suicide bomber Salman Abedi on the night he attacked Manchester Arena killing 22 people, have been been released by police. Fourteen locations are being searched and 11 men remain in custody on suspicion of terror offences. Abedi's identity was known within two hours of Monday's attack, police said. The UK threat level has been reduced from critical to severe and soldiers deployed to support the police will be gradually withdrawn from Monday night. Prime Minister Theresa May made the announcement after leading a meeting of the government's emergency committee Cobra on Saturday morning. Armed police continue to guard hundreds of events across the UK over the bank holiday weekend.

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  • Manchester attack: Chloe Rutherford and Liam Curry confirmed dead

    A teenage couple killed in the Manchester Arena explosion "adored each other", their families have said. "Inseparable" Chloe Rutherford, 17, and Liam Curry, 19, from South Shields were among 22 victims killed in Monday's suicide bomb attack. The pair were described as "perfect in every way for each other" by their relatives in a joint family tribute released through police. "They wanted to be together forever and now they are", it added. The statement, posted on Facebook, said the couple "lived to go to new places together and explore different cities". Chloe described herself as "ditzy", her family said, while Liam "would do anything for [her], including dealing with Chloe's demands for chocolate".

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  • US warship tests China's claims in South China Sea

    (CNN)A US Navy destroyer has sailed close to a disputed South China Sea island controlled by China for the first time under US President Donald Trump. The USS Dewey sailed within 12 miles (20 kilometers) of Mischief Reef, in the Spratly Island chain, on Wednesday, in a "freedom of navigation operation," according to a US official.

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  • Pakistan’s new coal project to provide power for 200 years

    A new coal mining project in the Thar desert is expected to provide enough power to last 200 years. It's also bringing jobs and opportunities to a community which has faced drought and famine. But many people have concerns about being uprooted from their ancestral land. Al Jazeera’s Kamal Hyder reports from Tharparkar, Sindh.

    Al Jazeera q
  • Here's what we know about Donald Trump's daughter Tiffany

    Donald Trump is no stranger to the limelight - and neither are his family. Daughter Ivanka is known for her many business ventures, including clothing ranges and books. And his eldest sons, Eric and Donald Jr. are businessmen, following in their father's footsteps. However, as the president's youngest daughter, Tiffany, looks to move to Washington DC this autumn for law school, we take a look at the life of the lesser-known Trump. She is the only daughter of President Trump and his second wife, actress Marla Maples, to whom he was married for six years. Tiffany grew up in California and went to school in Calabasas and boasts over one million followers on social media. This following has led to

    BBC Radio 1 Newsbeat q
  • Three years of Narendra Modi government

    In May 2014, the Hindu nationalist Bharatiya Janata Party came to power under the leadership of Narendra Modi, with the promise of development for all. Modi promised employment to millions of youth who join the job market every year, and to end corruption. In the past three years, more jobs have been lost than created, while the rise of far-right Hindu nationalists poses a danger to the unity of this diverse nation of 1.3 billion people. Did Modi deliver on his promises? Al Jazeera takes a look at the progress made in certain key sectors. India spends a little under three percent of the GDP on education, according to the World Bank data. Although there are still about 300 million people illiterate,

    Al Jazeera q
  • Greek goddess statue removed in Bangladesh after Islamist outcry

    Workers have begun to dismantle the statue of a Greek goddess from Bangladesh's Supreme Court complex, after an outcry from Islamists. The sculpture of Themis - the goddess of justice - wearing a sari was less than six months old, but Islamist groups demanded its removal by Friday. They claimed it hurt the religious sentiments of Muslims and it prompted mass protests in the capital, Dhaka. PM Sheikh Hasina agreed to its removal, but secular groups opposed it. Workers came with equipment and a crane at midnight to uproot the controversial statue, the BBC's Bangla service reported. The statue is being removed to maintain peace, said its creator Mrinal Haque. Analysts say this is a sign of the rising

    BBC News q
  • India opens longest bridge on China border

    India has inaugurated a 9.15km (5.68-mile) bridge over the Lohit river, easily its longest ever, which connects the disputed state of Arunachal Pradesh with the north-eastern state of Assam. China claims Arunachal Pradesh as its own, and refers to it as "southern Tibet". Beijing recently strongly objected to India's decision to allow Tibetan spiritual leader Dalai Lama to visit the state and has also protested against the development of military infrastructure there. But India has defended its right to do so. "With China getting more and more aggressive, it is time we strengthened our physical infrastructure to defend our territory," India's junior Home Minister Khiren Rijiju, a native of Arunachal

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  • The women accused of killing Kim Jong-nam

    The murder of Kim Jong-nam, the half brother of North Korea's leader, is likely to go down as one of the most notorious in history. Two women are now facing trial in Malaysia accused of his murder. Nga Pham of BBC Vietnamese and Rebecca Henschke of BBC Indonesian piece together their story. The CCTV footage from the departure lounge of Malaysia's Kuala Lumpur International Airport is unforgettable. A middle-aged man is approached from behind by two women who execute the most peculiar of manoeuvres, apparently wiping his face with vigour. Authorities say that was the moment that VX nerve agent, a deadly substance banned by the UN as a weapon of mass destruction, was used to murder Kim Jong-nam.

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  • Kylie Jenner accepts invite to be California teenager's high school prom date

    Kylie Jenner has surprised teenagers at a high school in California by turning up at their prom. The reality star was invited by student Albert Ochoa after his date turned him down. Videos posted on social media show the 19-year-old walking through crowds of people at Rio Americano High School on Saturday night. Kylie snapchatted a photo of herself in a prom dress with friend Jordyn Woods. "TELL ME WHY MY BROTHER TOOK KYLIE JENNER TO PROM 2NIGHT !!!!!!!", she wrote on Twitter. Albert retweeted videos showing him entering the prom with Kylie. Kylie attended high school until the end of ninth grade before being home schooled, and missed out on her own high school prom. She has previously talked

    BBC Radio 1 Newsbeat q
  • Ramadan 2017: Fasting hours around the world

    During Ramadan, Muslims around the world fast for a full lunar month - they begin fasting at the Fajr call to prayer just before sunrise and break their fast at sundown. In recent years, Ramadan has moved increasingly into the summer months which bring long days in the northern hemisphere and sweltering heat for many countries. Conversely, Ramadan has fallen on the shortest, winter days in the southern hemisphere. Last year, fasting hours across the world ranged between 11 and 22 hours. This year, fasting hours will range between 10 hours in Chile and 21 hours in Greenland.  Al Jazeera takes a look at how many hours Muslims, for whom fasting during Ramadan is one of the five pillars of Islam,

    Al Jazeera q
  • Zayn Malik defends Gigi Hadid after 'racist' Snapchat video

    Zayn Malik has defended his girlfriend Gigi Hadid in a single tweet after her sister Bella posted a Snapchat video of her. In it, Gigi holds up a Buddha-shaped cookie, squints her eyes and smiles. Bella has since deleted it after fans called the model racist against Asians. But it's still been widely shared online. Critics were keen to highlight Zayn's Asian heritage, prompting him to defend her. After being questioned by fans about the video, Zayn replied to one saying: "Trust me.. she likes asians ;)". Gigi Hadid was named international model of the year at the 2016 Fashion Awards last December. But this isn't the first time she's been criticised. She had to apologise after co-hosting the American

    BBC Radio 1 Newsbeat q