• BBC News

    BBC licence fee to rise by £3.50 in April

    The UK's annual television licence fee is to rise to £150.50 from £147, the government has announced. The increase, which will come into effect on 1 April, follows last year's rise to £147 from £145.50. Last year the government announced that the licence fee would rise in line with inflation for the next five years. Anyone watching or recording TV programmes as they are shown on TV, or watching or downloading BBC programmes on iPlayer, must have a licence. The charge applies whether they are using a TV set, computer or any other equipment. The fee also contributes to the costs of rolling out broadband to the UK population and helps to fund the Welsh Language TV channel S4C and local TV channels.

  • CNN

    Quincy Jones sorry for his lack of filter in two viral interviews

    (CNN)Quincy Jones might be an 85-year-old musical legend with nothing to prove, but that doesn't mean he isn't still learning from his mistakes. The interviews Jones referenced were with GQ and Vulture. In the chats, Jones was candid about his feelings about Taylor Swift ("We need more songs, man. F---ing songs, not hooks."), Paul McCartney ("the worst bass player I ever heard") and Michael Jackson (whom he called "greedy"), among others.

  • BBC News

    'Anti-depressants help me function'

    Scientists say more people could benefit from taking pills to reduce the symptoms of acute depression. Ellen Scott, who uses anti-depressants, spoke to BBC Breakfast and said: "It doesn't fix depression, but it makes me able to function".

  • CNN Money

    Judge says state can't force IMDB to take down actors' ages

    A federal judge has blocked a California law that would have forced IMDB to take down actors' ages on request. The law was signed by Governor Jerry Brown, a Democrat, in September 2016. It was supported by the Screen Actors Guild, which said the law it would help prevent age discrimination in film and television hiring. IMDB quickly challenged the law in court, saying that it "attempts to combat age discrimination in casting through content-based censorship." IMDB is widely used by the public for free. It also sells subscriptions to industry professionals, offering directories and resume tools, for $150 per year. The law would have allowed paid subscribers to ask that their ages be removed. Judge

  • CNN Money

    CPAC 2018: Year after coronation, Breitbart has diminished presence at conference

    Last year's edition of the Conservative Political Action Conference served as something of a coronation for Breitbart. The conference's lineup was littered with the website's writers. Steve Bannon, Breitbart's former executive chairman who at that point served as one of President Trump's top advisers, received a rock star's welcome. And the far-right site carried an indomitable presence throughout the week, staking out a prime position on radio row and hosting a glitzy party on a boat. This year's iteration of CPAC provides a vivid picture of how much has changed for Bannon and the site he used to lead. Ousted from Breitbart and shunned by Trump, Bannon isn't anywhere to be found. After claiming

  • CNN Money

    Florida shooting conspiracy theories: Here's how we can combat them

    In the real world, the funerals continue for victims of the Florida school shooting. In the virtual world, the survivors are the subject of relentless attacks. Yes, attacks. People on social media are sharing smears and conspiracy theories about the shooting and the survivors. Some of the attacks are designed to discredit the student activists and dismiss their calls for gun law reform. Criticism of policy positions is one thing. But lies and hoaxes are another thing altogether. These lies are like a form of pollution, poisoning our media environment and making us all sick. Case in point: The claims that student activist David Hogg is a "crisis actor," paid to pretend that he was a Parkland survivor

  • CNN

    'Game Night' serves up a comedy winner

    (CNN)Two words, nine letters: "Game Night" is a riot -- an energetic, consistently clever comedy that playfully toys with the expectations of a savvy audience weaned on such fare. Filled with knowing pop-culture references and deriving laughs from every key character, it's the kind of smart, fast-paced entertainment that makes a pretty delicate juggling act look easy. Introducing its central characters in a rapid-fire pre-credit sequence, Max (Jason Bateman) and Annie (Rachel McAdams) are shown meeting cute, bonding over their shared love of games and all sorts of competition. Soon enough, they're married and happily hosting a regular game night, while also trying to conceive, even if Max harbors some doubts about becoming a parent, perhaps especially in this participation-trophy age.