• China's failed South Korea embrace

    Earlier this month, two Chinese fishing vessels rammed and sunk a South Korean Coast Guard ship in response to Seoul's attempt to enforce against illegal fishing off the west coast of the Korean peninsula. The lost Korean vessel was trying to enforce laws against a quasi-fishing militia of more than 40 Chinese ships. Fortunately, both sides avoided a more harmful clash when reinforcements from the Korean Coast Guard defused the situation and scattered the remaining Chinese vessels after firing in the direction of the boats. South Korea has responded to the aggressive move by summoning the Chinese ambassador in Seoul and promising that any future incidents of illegal fishing would be met by armed force.

    Al Jazeera q
  • Michelle Obama: First lady's final state dinner is 'bittersweet'

    It was described as a "bittersweet moment" as Barack and Michelle Obama appeared on Tuesday for the final state dinner of the US president's time in office. "We saved the best for last," Mr Obama said, as the couple welcomed Italian Prime Minister Matteo Renzi and his wife Agnese Landini to the White House. The event, attended by guests from the worlds of politics, finance and fashion, was one of the largest of Mr Obama's eight years as president. It was Mrs Obama, however, who quickly became the focus of attention on social media after appearing in a rose gold Atelier Versace gown. Her choice of dress was likely to have been a deliberate nod to her Italian friends and a celebration of the close

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  • Saudi Arabia executes member of royal family

    Report: 'Blood money' refused The Saudi Gazette, an English-language newspaper based in Jeddah, said the victim's family had refused offers of "blood money" and demanded justice be carried out. It is extremely uncommon for a member of the Saudi royal family to be put to death in Saudi Arabia. In 1975, Prince Faisal bin Musaid was beheaded for assassinating King Faisal. "The government ... is keen to keep order, stabilize security and bring about justice through implementing the rules prescribed by Allah ... on whoever violates the sanctity of civilians," the Interior Ministry said. King as 'enforcer' The execution was "very rare," said Bruce Riedel, a senior fellow in the Center for Middle East

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  • Phillippine President: 'America has lost'

    In a state visit aimed at cozying up to Beijing as he pushes away from Washington, the Philippine President, Rodrigo Duterte, announced his military and economic "separation" from the United States. CNN's Jim Sciutto reports.

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  • Saudi minister: Oil-price downturn coming to an end

    Saudi Arabia’s Minister of Energy, Industry and Mineral Resources Khalid al-Falih said on Wednesday that the oil-price downturn was coming to an end. Speaking at the Oil & Money conference in London, Falih called for new investments to avert a supply shortage in the future, a Saudi Gazette report said. “We are now at the end of a considerable downturn,” he told an audience that included top executives from oil firms such as Exxon Mobil Corp., Royal Dutch Shell PLC and Total SA. Falih said the oil industry was starved of financing during a downturn over the past two years in which crude prices fell to less than $28 a barrel this year from $114 a barrel in 2014.

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  • Which country really has the cleverest students?

    Higher education has a strong sense of hierarchy. And high-profile international league tables are a very public form of this pecking order. While these might measure a whole range of factors - from reputation and staff ratios to research output - what they do not compare is the ability of students who have been taught in these universities. But the OECD, in its annual Education at a Glance, has published test results comparing the ability of graduates in different countries. And it shows a very different map of higher education than the ranking tables, which are dominated by US and UK universities, such as Harvard, MIT, Stanford, Oxford, Cambridge and UCL. The OECD tested literacy skills among

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  • Why are Russian warships in British waters?

    (CNN)Russia is believed to be sending a massive naval task force, with warships from its Northern, Baltic and Black Sea fleets, to the Mediterranean Sea in preparation for what could be a major escalation in the conflict in Syria. Russian defense officials say there are a number of heavily armed vessels already positioned in waters off the Syrian coast. The carrier -- the flagship of the Russian Navy -- is accompanied by submarine escorts, and at least seven other surface ships, including the giant nuclear battle cruiser, Peter the Great. Assembling such a large Mediterranean armada sends a powerful message about Russia's military capabilities.

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  • 'Cat-eyed' tea seller sparks soul searching

    ISLAMABAD: A Pakistani tea seller with velvet eyes saw his life changed this week when his portrait spread around the Internet, sparking ardent debates on class, objectification, and the place of ethnic Pashtuns in society. Arshad Khan had no idea he had set the Internet alight from Pakistan to India and beyond: He has no phone, and cannot read. “It was a real surprise,” the young “chaiwala”, or tea seller, told AFP. “I was aware that I am handsome but you can’t do anything when you are poor,” he said, adding that the image has “changed the way I think.” In the candid photograph, snapped by a passing photographer and posted on Instagram, Khan prepares Pakistan’s ubiquitous milk tea, his blue

    Kuwait Times q
  • Pakistani 'chai wala' turns model after finding fame

    A handsome "chai wala" (tea seller) in Pakistan has seen his life change overnight after a picture of him at work swept the internet. Arshad Khan, 18, was photographed pouring tea at Islamabad's Sunday Bazaar by photographer Javeria Ali. Thousands of lovestruck Twitter users quickly shared the picture, swooning over his piercing eyes, and #ChaiWala began trending across social media. Days later, Mr Khan shot his first modelling campaign. Fitin.pk, an online shopping site based in Islamabad, rushed to sign Mr Khan up and is already using pictures of him modelling menswear. A message on its website and Facebook page reads: "Chai wala is not more chai wala now he is fashion wala!" In an interview

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  • Pakistan bans Bollywood as tension with India rises

    Rising military tension between India and Pakistan has claimed an unlikely casualty: Bollywood. Pakistan's media regulator on Wednesday ordered satellite TV channels and radio stations to stop carrying any Indian movies or shows. The ban will take effect on Friday. "Channels violating this will have their license suspended immediately," the regulator said in a statement. The ban comes amid a period of heightened hostility between India and Pakistan in the disputed region of Kashmir, with the two countries trading gunfire at the border and verbal barbs. The war of words has escalated into a war of screens. The Indian Motion Picture Producers' Association voted in late September "not to work with

    CNN Money q
  • US flummoxed by Duterte's call for 'separation'

    Washington (CNN)Philippine President Rodrigo Duterte's surprise announcement of a military and economic "separation" from the US during a visit to Beijing Thursday left the Obama administration scrambling, as it raised questions about the US role in the region and threatened a realignment of US relationships in Asia. Duterte's declaration is the latest indication that the Philippines' president, just five months into his six-year term, intends to reshape his country's ties to its closest ally by doubling down on his pivot away from the US and toward China. "America has lost now," Duterte said at a business forum Thursday during a four-day state visit to Beijing. "I've realigned myself in your ideological flow and maybe I will also go to Russia to talk to Putin and tell him that there are three of us against the world -- China, Philippines and Russia.

    CNN q
  • 23 Absurdly Fab Photos from Karim El Chiaty & Victoria's Secret Model Ana Beatriz Barros' Wedding

    You might have noticed people making the move to Sahel, Gouna, and other such dreamy beachy lands during the Eid weekend, but what about the mysterious case of Mykonos? Why were our social media feeds suddenly flooded with images of the Greek tropical island? A coincidence? We think not. Everyone in the country (or world) has been buzzing – about what can only be described as the biggest, most glam wedding of the year where Brazilian Victoria’s Secret supermodel Ana Beatriz Barros tied the knot with Egyptian-Greek billionaire Karim El Chiati. You could say a few celebrities made an appearance. Nothing special. A slew of luxurious villas held over 400 guests who flew from all over the world for

    Cairo Scene q
  • Donald Trump: Iran should write us a thank you letter

    During the third presidential debate, Donald Trump said that Iran should write us a thank you letter if we were to take control of Mosul.

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  • 'The Biles' and other famous moves named after Olympic athletes and footballers

    Even if you don't consider yourself a gymnastics "fan" you've probably heard of Simone Biles. At Rio 2016 the 19-year-old won the individual all-round gold by a larger margin than 1980 to 2012 combined. The American is credited by many for turning the artistic gymnastics world upside down and even has a move named after her. Here's her move and some of the other famous sporting moves you may, or may not, know are named after an athlete. In gymnastics, if you do a double layout with half turn then you're doing a 'Biles' No idea what we're talking about? Us neither... It was officially recognised in 2013 at the Gymnastics World Championships in Antwerp. Simone isn't the first gymnast to have her

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  • Love Island will return for a third series

    Good news for fans of Love Island - ITV has announced it will be back next year. Bosses have ordered a third season of one of the summer's most talked about shows. Its second run is thought to have doubled last year's viewing figures, with an average of 1.3 million people watching each episode. "We can't wait to do it all again next year," said ITV Studios creative director Richard Cowles. Although the series officially finished last night with Nathan Massey and Cara De La Hoyde crowned champions, it will return for a special episode on Sunday 17 July. Love Island: Heading Home will follow the islanders as they're reunited at the wrap party. Which will no doubt mean clashes as exes come face-to-face

    BBC Radio 1 Newsbeat q
  • US warship challenges China’s claims in South China Sea-officials

    WASHINGTON: A US navy warship sailed near islands claimed by China in the South China Sea on Friday, the latest attempt to counter what Washington sees as Beijing’s efforts to limit freedom of navigation in the strategic waters, US officials said. The guided-missile destroyer USS Decatur challenged “excessive maritime claims” near the Paracel Islands, among a string of islets, reefs and shoals over which China has territorial disputes with its neighbors, the officials said, speaking on condition of anonymity. The latest US patrol, first reported by Reuters, is expected to anger Beijing and could further escalate tensions over the South China Sea. The destroyer sailed within waters claimed by China, close to but not within the 12-nautical-mile territorial limits of the islands, the officials said.

    Arab News q
  • OPINION: US eases critical Iran sanctions

    The harsh rhetoric of Iran’s hardliners toward the United States and other “rivals” of Tehran has not moderated. Nevertheless, the Obama administration continues to soften its stance toward the Islamic Republic. Figures on sanction list are free The sanction relief against Iranian banks remove a robust mechanism that was in place to monitor the country’s compliance with UN resolutions in areas such as ballistic missiles and nuclear materials Dr. Majid Rafizadeh Iran can also use US currency Banks off the hook Last Update: Friday, 21 October 2016 KSA 10:05 - GMT 07:05

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  • Vladimir Putin's inspirational 2017 calendar

    (CNN)Are you looking for the perfect Christmas present for the Vladimir Putin fan in your life? Look no further... the Russian President's 2017 calendar is now on sale! The calendar, which can be purchased for 95 cents at kiosks across Moscow, contains carefully-crafted photographs of Russia's leader holding a kitten, dressed in a wetsuit, riding a horse (wearing a jacket this time) and relaxing in a tree after a 9-kilometer (5-mile) hike. Published by the Russian tabloid magazine Zvezdi I Soveti (Stars and Advice), the pictures are accompanied by a series of quotes from Putin addressing his love for cats, the importance of bread and Russia's military power.

    CNN q
  • Hijabi Fashion and the “Enslavement of Women”

    Last week, the social media sphere was set ablaze as French Families Minister Laurence Rossignol criticised fashion labels who produce Islamic collections, accusing them of promoting the shutting away of women’s bodies and comparing veiled women with “negroes who supported slavery.” Her comment followed Yves Saint Laurent Co-Founder Pierre Berge’s harsh criticism of the fashion chains who follow the lead of Italian designers Dolce & Gabbana, who released their hijab and abaya collection last January. "Designers are there to make women more beautiful, to give them their freedom, not to collaborate with this dictatorship which imposes this abominable thing by which we hide women and make them live

    Cairo Scene q
  • Sci-fi stories envisage Iraq in 100 years

    A Chinese-run hive of digital development dependent on "water trains" from Europe. A hi-tech destination for a new generation of religious pilgrims. A dried-out wasteland with little left to trade but corpses and sand. When the award-winning Iraqi writer Hassan Blasim and British publisher Ra Page asked Iraqi writers to imagine their homeland in 2103, 100 years after the US-led invasion, a plethora of haunting, dissonant - and sometimes uplifting - versions of the future emerged. The resulting anthology, Iraq +100, published in the UK this week mixes science fiction with other genres including fantasy, fairy tale and satire. The aim was to overturn literary traditions Mr Blasim felt had become

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