• US: Black man 'shot by police' while helping patient

    A black therapist in the US state of Florida trying to calm a man with autism in the middle of the street says he was shot by police, even though he had his hands in the air and repeatedly told them that both were unarmed. The moments before the shooting on Monday were recorded on cellphone video, showing Charles Kinsey lying on the ground with his arms raised, talking to his patient and police throughout the standoff with officers, who appeared to have them surrounded. "As long as I've got my hands up, they're not going to shoot me. This is what I'm thinking. They're not going to shoot me," he told WSVN-TV later from his hospital bed, where he was recovering from a gunshot wound to his leg.

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  • Euro 2016: Fans predict an easy start for England

    Euro 2016 is up and running then. But while France may have won their opening match of Euro 2016 it's this weekend's games that really count. Well, at least for the home nations, as England, Northern Ireland and Wales all play their first games of the tournament. Newsbeat is following all three teams and will be wielding its "generic tablet" over the coming days. As we ask the fans: What will the score be? We took to the streets of Marseille, where England play Russia on Saturday night, to get the fans' predictions. Adam Farmer, 23, from Swindon claims he wasn't very good at art during school. We disagree. In amongst this creation, he plucked for a 2-1 win for England. "Dele Alli will score the

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  • Saudi researcher wins $3.5m in defamation suit

    BOSTON: A jury in Boston ordered the payment of $3.5 million to visiting Saudi researcher at Harvard University.Hayat Sindi had filed a defamation suit against a woman and her mother, who had publicly accused Sindi of forging her educational qualifications. Sindi's lawyer said she filed the case against Samia El-Moslymani and her mother Ann, 77, saying: “The daughter and her mother were engaged in a campaign to embarrass and humiliate her and destroy her by publicly spreading lies on the Internet, social media and e-mails.” The comments made by Samia and her mother were lies, the lawyer said. He pointed out that with the decision, Sindi could resume her efforts to promote sciences and entrepreneurship

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  • Tehran stops ‘terrorist infiltration’ from Turkey

    TEHRAN: Iranian forces have foiled a “terrorist” bid to infiltrate the country from Turkey, the official IRNA news agency said Friday, in the latest report of tension at its borders.The elite Revolutionary Guards intercepted on Thursday “a terrorist group trying to infiltrate the country using Iran’s border with Turkey,” IRNA reported quoting a commander. One suspect was killed and one arrested while the other two fled back toward Turkey, said Alireza Madani, a commander in the West Azerbaijan province that borders Turkey. They were intercepted near Salmas and two military rifles were seized. “Based on the intelligence, the four terrorists were counter-revolutionary elements who lived in Turkey.

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  • Watch: Saudi heat causes manhole cover to shake

    Sunday, 24 July 2016 To view this video please enable JavaScript, and consider upgrading your web browser From Saudi Arabia we received a video depicting a manhole cover

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  • Love Island will return for a third series

    Good news for fans of Love Island - ITV has announced it will be back next year. Bosses have ordered a third season of one of the summer's most talked about shows. Its second run is thought to have doubled last year's viewing figures, with an average of 1.3 million people watching each episode. "We can't wait to do it all again next year," said ITV Studios creative director Richard Cowles. Although the series officially finished last night with Nathan Massey and Cara De La Hoyde crowned champions, it will return for a special episode on Sunday 17 July. Love Island: Heading Home will follow the islanders as they're reunited at the wrap party. Which will no doubt mean clashes as exes come face-to-face

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  • Why ice cream won't help your sunburn but oatmeal will

    After catching some rays on the hottest day of the year, some of us may be feeling a bit pink today. Obviously the best way to avoid sunburn is to wear sunscreen but what if you forgot and got burnt? There's lots of advice on what to do and some of it can be a bit misleading. Newsbeat's been speaking to Dr Nisith Sheth from the British Skin Foundation who tells us what is good - and what isn't - for burnt skin. Ice cream When your skin is burning up, it may be tempting to cool off with the coldest thing you can find on the beach. But Dr Nisith Sheth says putting ice cream on your skin is not a good idea. "Whilst the cooling affect of the ice cream may reduce the inflammation, the contents of

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  • What it's like looking like Taylor Swift

    Olivia Sturgiss is like many 19-year-old women. She's studying at uni, she works in a clothes shop and she lives in a house share. Except Olivia looks rather a lot like Taylor Swift. And it could make her a lot of money. "I wore the red lipstick like any other fan does, and I wore a sparkly outfit and then ever since then, it was something commented on every day," Olivia told Newsbeat. "Even when I was wearing no make-up at work, I'd have just have my hair tied back, natural face and I'd still get comments on it. "It's always been a natural resemblance and it's always been an ongoing thing since I was really young." Olivia's been a fan of Tay's for more than seven years and says it's flattering

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  • ASEAN bloc breaks deadlock on South China Sea

    Southeast Asian nations have overcome days of deadlock after the Philippines dropped a request for their joint statement to mention a landmark legal ruling on the South China Sea, officials said, after objections from Cambodia. China publicly thanked Cambodia on Monday for supporting its stance on maritime disputes, a position which threw the regional block's weekend meeting in the Laos capital of Vientiane into disarray. Competing claims with China in the vital shipping lane are among the most contentious issues for the Association of Southeast Asian Nations, as the bloc's 10 members are pulled between their desire to assert sovereignty while finding common ground and fostering ties with Beijing. In a ruling by the United Nations-backed Permanent Court of Arbitration on July 12, the Philippines won an emphatic legal victory over China on the dispute.

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  • Saudi Arabia vs Dubai: The 2020 Race For The World’s Tallest Tower

    It seems like Dubai is bored of smashing Guinness World Records, as flagship developer Emaar Properties announces plans to construct the world’s tallest tower, surpassing the Burj Khalifa that currently holds the current world record, but will Saudi Arabia steal the title? The race is on as property developer Emaar has announced plans to build a new tower, with an estimated cost of $1 billion, that will stand a ‘notch’ taller than 830-metre Burj Khalifa. The proposed project expects completion by 2020, which coincidentally will be the same year that Dubai will host the World Expo Trading Fair. The announcement explained that Spanish-Swiss architect Santiago Calatrava Valls is expected to devote

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  • What's the point of Asean?

    Fourteen years after they first began discussing their differences with China over the South China Sea, the 10 members of Asean - the Association of Southeast Asian Nations - have once again bowed to pressure and produced a watered-down joint statement at their summit, in Laos. No mention of China, which has been creating "facts" in the sea by building islands on disputed reefs. No mention of the recent ruling at the Permanent Court of Arbitration in The Hague that China had no historic rights over the area. Once again, it was the smaller Asean members under China's thumb - Cambodia, and host-nation Laos - that were the weak link in the bloc's efforts to stand up to its giant neighbour. And so,

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  • Rita Ora confirms she's leaving The X Factor

    Rita Ora has confirmed that she's leaving The X Factor. The singer, who joined the show last year, tweeted: "I had a ball on The X Factor last year and will miss the team. "@simoncowell can't wait to work with you again... I'll be round for dinner soon. Thank you for the experience & love X" Rita took on the role after moving from The Voice UK, which is moving from the BBC to ITV. The singer mentored the girls category and went on to win the show with her act, Louisa Johnson. In a statement ITV told Newsbeat: "Rita brought a great energy to the show last year and did a brilliant job mentoring the girls' category, leading Louisa to victory. "We wish her all the best with her music and film plans

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  • 'India does not understand Kashmir's problems'

    The death of a popular militant in Indian-administered Kashmir has led to large scale protests across the region. Over 40 people have died and another 1,800 injured. The Indian government has blamed Pakistan for fuelling the unrest. BBC Hindi's Zubair Ahmed spoke to some youth to understand their point of view.

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  • Some things you probably don't know about Hillary Clinton

    But her victory isn't being celebrated by some young Democrats who wanted the more left-leaning Bernie Sanders to take on Donald Trump. They see her as an establishment figure who is power hungry. That's largely because she's lived in the White House before - when she was first lady. Her husband Bill Clinton was US president from 1993 to 2001. You probably know that - but here are some other facts about Hillary Clinton which haven't been talked about in the campaign so far. She was a civil rights activist - from a Republican family Hillary Clinton grew up in Illinois with a staunchly conservative father. She was even a member of her now rivals, the Republican Party. In her first year she was

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  • How people in Turkey feel, one week on

    "State of emergency means military rule and so does the coup, so what is the difference? I don't know who was behind the coup. You want to believe it was Fethullah [Gulen] because there were so many dead and injured. But then you see tens of thousands of government personnel had their jobs taken away." Ridvan, a 26-year-old cook "Those who did this to us are in the wrong. But Turkey will deliver unto them justice, God willing. The state of emergency doesn't make me concerned. This is a coup that was against Turkey in its entirety. We will make them all pay for their actions. This coup won't affect my daily life." Ali, a 70-year-old teacher "I'm worried because the people's freedoms will be limited.

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  • The government's launched a crackdown on illegal downloading

    Do you ever get suspicious that more people in your school or office talk about Game of Thrones than subscribe to Sky? Well you're not alone. The government's launched a new crackdown on illegal downloading, and as part of it they're planning to introduce tougher sentences for internet pirates. It comes days after claims the company behind Game of Thrones has started sending out its own warnings to people who steal episodes. What does the law say? Your "intellectual property" is anything you create, like a song or a video, that you can't hold in your hands. And some of it's worth big money. The government estimates that all the intellectual property rights in the UK combined are worth more than

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  • Two Muslim Women Kicked Off JetBlue Flight for ‘Staring’ at Flight Attendant

    In what would have been a shocking but is now an all-too-familiar Islamophobic incident, two Muslim women were led off a passenger plane as a flight attendant did not like the way the women ‘stared’ at her, according to DailyMail. On Saturday, two Muslim women in hijabs onboard JetBlue Flight 487 between Boston and Los Angeles were escorted out of the airliner by police as one of the flight attendants was concerned about the way the two women were looking at her. A video showing the two women being escorted out for questioning was posted on YouTube on Monday by Mark Frauenfelder, taken by his friend Sharon Kessler. In regards to the incident, Kessler told DailyMail that "it was a terrible moment

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  • Who wins if Putin meddles in U.S. election?

    Disclosures that cause discord in the U.S. and sully American democracy can only benefit Putin's core political project -- chipping away the West's political institutions to weaken the power of what has been called the free world. And the Russian leader clearly nurtures deep personal animosity against the Obama administration and Clinton, its former secretary of state. It's beyond question that the former KGB agent in the Kremlin has the means, through Russia's sophisticated intelligence services, to sow mischief in the U.S. presidential election. And Putin has the motivation -- a long-simmering grudge against the West. "Was the 2016 election a target?" Matthew Rojansky, director of the Kennan

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  • MH370 'must not go into oblivion', says pilot's sister

    Sakinab Shah doesn't give many interviews. She's wary, because her brother was Captain Zaharie Ahmad Shah, the man flying MH370 on the night it vanished more than two years ago. "I've got to lend him a voice. He's gone. If I don't talk on his behalf, if I don't portray him as the real person that he was, nobody will be any the wiser." Captain Shah was an experienced pilot with an unblemished record, yet after the Malaysian government said that the plane's disappearance was deliberate, some fingers began pointing at the skipper in the cockpit. I met Sakinab at her home in Kuala Lumpur, where her brother was a regular visitor. He lived nearby. She told me about the moment he fell under suspicion.

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  • What music stars like Ellie Goulding and Stormzy think about the EU referendum

    She's voting to remain, in case you wondered. And when fans threatened to boycott her gigs because they didn't agree with her views? She told them not to come. Mixing pop and politics can be a bit of a minefield, but we caught up with some major names in the British music industry to discover where they stand on the upcoming vote. Jamie MacColl from Bombay Bicycle Club can see some major issues for musicians if the UK chooses to leave the EU. "Primarily I'm interested in the implications of touring round Europe," he tells Newsbeat. "At the moment, musicians don't have to travel with visas round Europe so there's no visa fees. "If you're an up and coming band, when touring Europe, it's very expensive

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