• BBC News

    Ariana speaks out on 'toxic relationship'

    Ariana Grande has spoken out about her "toxic relationship" with ex-boyfriend Mac Miller. She was responding to comments from a Twitter user, who said what happened to Miller after "Grande dumped him" was "the most heartbreaking thing". The tweets also referred to Miller's reported arrest last week, for drink driving after he crashed his car in LA. Grande said she should not be shamed "for a man's inability to keep it together". Her full reply to user Elijah Flint reads, "how absurd that you minimise female self-respect and self-worth by saying someone should stay in a toxic relationship because he wrote an album about them, which by the way isn't the case (just Cinderella is about me). "I am

  • BBC News

    Water resistant sunscreen claims 'don't wash'

    Water-resistant sunscreen products work much less well after they have been worn in the sea, a consumer group has warned ahead of the summer holiday season. Which? tested two products claiming to be water resistant and found the sun protection factor (SPF) dropped by up to 59% after 40 minutes in salt water. Cancer Research UK welcomed the study, warning no sunscreen is 100% effective. But a group representing sunscreen makers called the research alarmist. Current UK tests allow manufacturers to claim a sunscreen is water resistant if the SPF drops by as much as 50% after two 20-minute periods of immersion. The tests are carried out using tap water. However, Which? said its more rigorous tests

  • BBC News

    'Hero' nurse who died battling Nipah

    "I don't think I will be able to see you again. Sorry. Please raise our children well." Lini Puthussery, a 28-year-old nurse, wrote this note to her husband as she succumbed to the deadly Nipah virus on Monday in India's southern state of Kerala. She has two sons, aged five and two. At least nine other people have died in the outbreak in Kozhikode, formerly Calicut. Two others who have tested positive for the virus are critically ill. Some 40 people have been put into quarantine following the deaths. Health authorities across Kerala have been on alert, setting up medical camps and a control room to tackle the situation. The virus, which can be transmitted from animals to humans, is hard to diagnose.

  • BBC News

    Why this face tattoo has got NZ talking

    Facial tattoos have been a part of Maori culture for centuries, a sacred marker of the wearer's genealogy and heritage. But one woman's striking chin design- or moko - has generated huge debate in New Zealand, because she is white, with no Maori heritage. Sally Anderson, who is married to a Maori man, says her moko symbolises her personal struggles and life story. But she's been accused of appropriating Maori culture for personal gain. "We have to protect the last bastions that we have as Maori to make us different," said one expert. Why are moko so important to Maori? Moko are carved into the skin using chisels. They are a sacred tradition, denoting a person's links with their family and cultural

  • CNN

    Excuse us Taylor Swift, you were blocking the BMAs

    Also there were actress Sarah Michelle Gellar, basketball superstar Kobe Bryant and his wife Vanessa and model/actress Amber Rose who snapped a selfie backstage with Swift and actresses Julia Roberts and Rebel Wilson. Swift kept the star power up on stage with guest appearances by singer/songwriter Troye Sivan and Swift's bff Selena Gomez. She and Gomez performed the latter's hit "Hands to Myself" and Gomez praised her longtime friend as one who has "never ever judged a single decision I've made." "She's always met me where I've been," Gomez said. "She's encouraged me when I've had nothing to be encouraged about, and I don't know if I would be as strong as I am if I didn't have you and your family

  • CNN

    Regime change in Iran could cost the US trillions

    It's impossible to say with any level of precision what a US attempt to overthrow the Iranian government might cost, but our experience with Iraq offers some clues. Economic sanctions hurt millions of ordinary Iraqis. But Saddam Hussein was able to manipulate the shortages caused by sanctions to posture his regime as the sole source of sustenance for the population. As veteran journalist David Rieff noted in a detailed analysis of the 1990s sanctions regime, they "palpably failed to dislodge his [Saddam's] government and in fact strengthened him politically." After sanctions failed to displace Hussein's government, many proponents of regime change in Iraq placed their faith in Ahmed Chalabi and

  • CNN

    How Michael Jackson's tilt defied gravity

    Fascinated by Jackson and his seemingly inhuman abilities, Yagnick and Tripathi began to investigate just how the pop legend was able to accomplish his feat. Along with another colleague, Dr. Sandeep Mohindra, they published their observations from a neurosurgeon's point of view on Tuesday in the Journal of Neurosurgery: "How did Michael Jackson challenge our understanding of spine biomechanics?" On the left, how the body is supposed to bend; on the right, how Michael Jackson did it When the human body bends forward with the back straight, the doctors explain, the erector spinae muscles that run parallel to our vertebrae "act like cables" and support the body as the center of gravity shifts.