• How the wealthy untie the knot

    As Brad Pitt and Angelina Jolie are no doubt finding out, divorce is painful - and expensive. While the pain is the same for rich and poor, the expense, for the rich, can be a lot, lot greater. The numbers are eye-watering, from estimated £600 an hour top-tier divorce lawyers, to massive pay-outs at the end of the case. Financier Sir Chris Hohn holds the record for a British settlement, paying £337 million to his former wife, Jamie Cooper-Hohn in 2014. Last year Liam Gallagher and Nicole Appleton spent £800,000 on legal fees and ended up splitting his (or, perhaps more accurately, their) £11m fortune down the middle. Although Ms Jolie filed for the "dissolution of marriage" on Monday in the Los

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  • China covers portions of Great Wall with cement

    Public decries the Chinese government's decision to repair a 700-year-old stretch of China's Great Wall with a smooth, white trail of cement.

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  • Rihanna to be awarded MTV Video Music Award lifetime achievement prize

    Rihanna will receive MTV's lifetime achievement award at the Video Music Awards later this month. It's MTV's highest honour and is known as the Michael Jackson video vanguard award. Last year Kanye West won the trophy, with Beyonce, Justin Timberlake and Britney Spears previously getting it. "[The award] reflects an artist's impact not just on music but on pop culture, fashion, film and philanthropy," says MTV. She will also perform at the ceremony in New York, as well as being nominated for best collaboration and best female video. Beyonce leads the nominations though with 11 nods, while Adele is up for eight. It's the first time the event has been held at Madison Square Garden and it will feature

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  • South Korea reveals it has a plan to assassinate Kim Jong Un

    North Korea has a history of using creative language to express loathing for its enemies. Here are some of the regime's more colorful threats against the West. North Korea warned it would make a "preemptive and offensive nuclear strike" in response to joint U.S.-South Korean military exercises. Pyongyang issued a long statement promising that "time will prove how the crime-woven history of the U.S. imperialists who have grown corpulent through aggression and war will come to an end and how the Park Geun Hye group's disgraceful remaining days will meet a miserable doom as it is keen on the confrontation with the fellow countrymen in the north."

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  • Egyptian Girl Sold Into Slavery at the Age of 8 Publishes Her Memoirs

    Despite having been heavily covered by western media, the sad saga of an Egyptian girl who was robbed of her childhood in the cruelest way possible is only just beginning to become known here in Egypt after one Facebook user took to the social network to share her story, which is rapidly going viral  Although born in 1991, Shyima Hall’s life didn’t really begin until 2002 when she was freed from the shackles of slavery her own parents had sold her into for the mere price of $30. Born in grinding poverty, little Shyima lived with her parents and ten siblings in an Alexandria slum until she was traded to a rich family for whom her older sister used to work as a maid. The wealthy employers accused

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  • UAE, Saudi Arabia in top 10 with highest number of international schools

    The United Arab Emirates (UAE) has retained its position at the top of the world’s listing for countries with the most number of English-medium international schools at 589, compared to only 511 last year. Saudi Arabia was 6th with 243 international schools, while Egypt was 8th with 191. The data was released by The International Schools Consultancy (ISC), a leading global market intelligence and research firm focused on international English-speaking schools as part of a report that will be presented in full at the forthcoming International Private Schools Education Forum (IPSEF) Middle East on Sept. 27-28, 2016 at the Jumeirah Creekside Hotel. Richard Gaskell, Director for International Schools at the ISC, will be presenting the very latest data on international school growth in the Middle East plus a detailed analysis on the employment of teachers at international schools in the region.

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  • Boeing and Airbus get US green light to sell planes to Iran

    Cleared for takeoff! Boeing and Airbus have been given the green light by the U.S. government to sell planes to Iran despite fierce political opposition to the deal. The Treasury department has approved the delivery of more than 100 Boeing (BA) aircraft and 17 Airbus passenger planes, marking a key step for Iran's foreign business dealings now that its economic sanctions are lifted. Boeing (BA) is a U.S. company headquartered in Chicago. Airbus (EADSF), a European consortium, needed U.S. government approval to sell aircraft to Iran because many parts are made in the U.S. and the American authorities want to ensure the country doesn't use the planes for military purposes. Iran has agreed to buy

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  • Everyone is Talking About the Egyptian Olympian Facing an Israeli Opponent

    News of Egyptian Judo player, Islam el-Shehaby, competing against Israeli Or Sasson, is becoming a source of uproar social media.  The reactions in Egyptian social media ranged from some objecting and demanding his withdrawal, and some challenging this view and asserting that he should go through with it. Those who object believe it is a choice the Egyptian judoka should not even contemplate, because according to them, it is a given that relations with Israel must be avoided, even in international sports arenas. As for those who believe he should go through with it, they are certain that el-Shehaby is strong enough to take the Israeli judoka down – a win that will metaphorically represent Egypt,

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  • Inside China's ghost towns: 'Developers run out of money'

    One of the challenges of filming in China is dealing with the dreadfully long traffic jams. It is a reality many of us are used to in the world's most populous nation. So you can imagine how surreal it feels to be walking down a silent eight-lane highway, devoid of life during rush hour. Our cameraman and I were in Shenfu, a city in northeastern China that has come to symbolise the country's faltering economy.  Shenfu is a ghost town sprawling over 22sq km. Where there once was farmland, abandoned buildings now litter the landscape.  It is one of hundreds of deserted cities across China where construction has ground to a halt. Walking through some of these failed projects, we find many with their

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  • Singapore pair 'tried to buy iPhones at airport without flying'

    The launch of the latest iPhone last week saw the usual excited queues forming outside Apple shops. But two Singaporeans allegedly thought they had found a new way of queue jumping, and saving some money, by buying plane tickets so they could pick up the iPhone 7 at Changi Airport. They were arrested on 16 September for breaking airport laws. Police said they had "no intention" of leaving Singapore so should not have been in the departure hall. The two have been charged under the Protected Areas and Protected Places Act. They face a fine of up to 1,000 Singapore dollars ($735; £565) and a jail term of up to two years if convicted. Police have warned others not to misuse their boarding passes

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  • Corpse found in airplane’s wheel bay at Jeddah

    Saudi Gazette report  JEDDAH – Saudi airline workers found a body in the wheel well of an airliner on Wednesday after the plane returned from Nigeria, the Saudi Press Agency reported quoting Jeddah’s King Abdulaziz International Airport administration.The plane, operated by Saudi Arabian carrier “flynas,” was undergoing a regular check after landing at the airport.  It had returned to the Kingdom after transporting Haj pilgrims back to Nigeria.  “At around ‪12 p.m.‬, an unidentified corpse of a dark skinned person was found in the back wheel storage,” the report said.Stowaways occasionally risk death by sneaking into aircraft wheel wells.   The concerned authorities have completed the necessary

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  • Ghana's problem with 'racist' Gandhi

    Nelson Mandela said that the teachings of Mahatma Gandhi had helped to topple apartheid in South Africa. Emperor of Ethiopia, Haile Selassie I, was also an admirer. "Mahatma Gandhi will always be remembered as long as free men and those who love freedom and justice live," he said. Yet not all African leaders are inspired by the man known as the "Father of India". An online petition, which has been signed by more than 1,000 people, has been started by professors at the University of Ghana. They call for the removal of a statue of Mohandas Karamchand Gandhi from the campus grounds in Accra. The academics say that Gandhi, who has been praised by public figures for leading India's non-violent movement

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  • India needs more than Rafale to match China: experts – Peninsula OnQatar Daily Star

    New Delhi: India might have only spent billions of dollars on hi-tech French warrior jets, though experts contend it needs to do a lot some-more if it is going to face adult to an increasingly noisy China. The world’s tip counterclaim importer has sealed several big-ticket deals as partial of a $100-billion ascent given Hindu jingoist Prime Minister Narendra Modi took energy in 2014. But it has been delayed to reinstate a shrinking swift of Russian MiG-21s — dubbed “Flying Coffins” since of their bad reserve record. An agreement to buy 36 slicing corner Rafale jets from France’s Dassault aims to repair that. “It will give a atmosphere force an arrowhead. Our atmosphere force has aged aircraft,

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  • 23 Absurdly Fab Photos from Karim El Chiaty & Victoria's Secret Model Ana Beatriz Barros' Wedding

    You might have noticed people making the move to Sahel, Gouna, and other such dreamy beachy lands during the Eid weekend, but what about the mysterious case of Mykonos? Why were our social media feeds suddenly flooded with images of the Greek tropical island? A coincidence? We think not. Everyone in the country (or world) has been buzzing – about what can only be described as the biggest, most glam wedding of the year where Brazilian Victoria’s Secret supermodel Ana Beatriz Barros tied the knot with Egyptian-Greek billionaire Karim El Chiati. You could say a few celebrities made an appearance. Nothing special. A slew of luxurious villas held over 400 guests who flew from all over the world for

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  • Taiwan asks Google to blur images of South China Sea island

    TAIPEI, Taiwan: Taiwan’s defense ministry has asked Google to blur images of a new development believed to be for military use on a disputed South China Sea island.Tensions remain high in the region over conflicting territorial claims, particularly over the strategically important Spratlys chain. Taiwan administers Taiping island, which is the largest in the Spratlys archipelago. The island chain is also claimed in part or whole by the Philippines, Vietnam and China. Google satellite images show a circular structure with four Y-shaped attachments, jutting out to sea on Taiping’s northwestern coast. The development comes after Taiwan last year inaugurated a solar-powered lighthouse, an expanded

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  • King Salman: An epitome of hope

    RIYADH: A towering figure and accomplished statesman Custodian of the Two Holy Mosques King Salman is a visionary, a great philanthropist, and above all an epitome of hope for the Kingdom and the whole Middle East region. King Salman, who succeeded his brother late King Abdullah upon his death on Jan. 23, 2015, is a stalwart among world’s statesmen, whose contributions to the Saudi nation, to the peace and security of the Middle East region and to the world at large have no parallels. King Salman is also credited with transforming Riyadh from a mud city to a thriving modern world-class capital during his tenure as governor. With his active support and governance, Saudi Arabia is becoming more prosperous besides being a significant donor of foreign aid.

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  • Meet the world's richest young billionaires as Hugh Grosvenor inherits £9bn

    He had three daughters but only one son, 25-year-old Hugh Grosvenor, who is heir to the dukedom. Hugh has now inherited "half of London" after his father's estate covers most of Belgravia and Mayfair - the most expensive area on the Monopoly board. He hasn't had to work for his father's money. But he does have a job as an account manager for Bio-bean - a green technology company. According to the 2016 Forbes Rich List there are nine other under-30s worth more than $1bn - so we thought we'd find out who some of them are. At 20 and 21, Alexandra and Katharina Andresen are the youngest Johan, a Norwegian industrialist and investor, transferred his fortune to his two daughters in 2007. Norway is

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  • Hill Republicans frustrated with GOP disunity over Trump

    Washington (CNN)A brewing civil war within the GOP has House Republicans picking sides, with plenty of members backing up party Chairman Reince Priebus in threatening consequences for those who don't get behind nominee Donald Trump. "Any person in this party that does not support Trump at this point is increasing the chances of Hillary Clinton becoming president and destroying the Constitution," Arizona Rep. Trent Franks told CNN Wednesday. Franks had endorsed Texas Sen. Ted Cruz in the primary. The rancor comes after Priebus, the chairman of the Republican National Committee, said Sunday on CBS' "Face the Nation" that if Trump opponents don't "get on board," it's not "going to be that easy for them" to run for office again.

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  • Shakespeare Lives - Ballet, Opera and the Bard

    Great music and performance from the world of ballet and opera, presented by Ore Oduba. We join Royal Ballet stars Lauren Cuthbertson and Edward Watson as they rehearse The Winter’s Tale. Also featured; the potion scene from Kenneth MacMillan’s classic Romeo and Juliet and music from Verdi’s two great Shakespearean operas Otello and Falstaff. Watch live and on demand via the BBC Live page

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  • Italian driver races China daredevil road in record time

    An Italian driver has raced up China's Tongtian Road, considered one of the world's most dangerous, in record time. Fabio Barone covered the nearly 11km (6.8 mile) route in just 10 minutes 31 seconds, on 21 September. The road has 99 sharp turns on its way up Tianmen Mountain, rising from 200 to 1,300 metres above sea level. He had his Ferrari specially modified for the attempt, shaving crucial kilos off its weight by swapping metal for carbon fibre parts. Mr Barone is not new to racing hairy mountain roads, having set another speed record last year on the Transfagarasan mountain road in the Transylvanian Alps in Romania. Tianmen Mountain is no stranger to extreme motor sports either, having

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