• Egyptian Airport Security Victoriously 'Flips the Bird' After Confiscating EGP 1.36m Hidden in Ducks

    Earlier Today, EGP 1.36 million has been found stuffed in raw ducks in the luggage of a man en route to Kuwait, according to Al Wafd. Port security manager General Hossam Nasr caught the man, who goes by the name of Tamer, in customs, smuggling the duck-filled money in Asyut airport. Tamer’s luggage had initially passed the first phase of airport screening without the ducks being detected. After discovering the money hidden within the ducks, the team behind the bust decided to pose for a photo with one guard 'flipping the bird' in celebration, which has since gone viral on social media.  According to Sadaa News, The smuggler is an Egyptian who originally resides in Abnub, Asyut. He has a bachelor

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  • Senior Iranian military commander visits Moscow in violation of UN resolution

    Iranian Quds Force commander Qassem Soleimani traveled to Moscow, violating multiple United Nations resolutions forbidding him from leaving Iran, Fox News quoted US security sources saying. Soleimani is visiting Moscow to express his displeasure with the growing relations between Russia, Saudi Arabia and other Arab countries, in light of their weapons and economic deals, the report said.

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  • Indiana girls Liberty German and Abigail William found dead

    Two 13-year-old US girls who went missing on Monday have been found dead, and the case is being investigated as a double homicide, police say. The bodies, recovered on Tuesday near a creek in the US state of Indiana, were of Liberty German and Abigail Williams, post-mortem examinations confirmed. The girls were reported missing when they failed to show up to a meeting point after a hike. Police have yet to release a cause of death, citing an ongoing investigation. The girls' bodies were discovered along the edge of Deer Creek, about a mile east of Delphi, Indiana. They were found not far from an abandoned rail bridge where they had been dropped off to go hiking on Monday. The pair were reported

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  • The world's most unusual assassinations

    There is nothing new about a high-profile or outspoken person being assassinated. It is one of the oldest tools in the book to get rid of someone who is either too powerful, too dangerous or too inconvenient. But most assassins choose a straight-forward method: Julius Caesar was stabbed to death, Abraham Lincoln was shot. It is now being speculated that the death of Kim Jong-nam - Kim Jong-un's oldest half-brother - may have been another one. If that proves true, its rumoured method - which supposedly saw two female assassins placing a poison-laced handkerchief over his mouth as he walked through the airport - puts his assassination among a select list of those killed by people who have chosen

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  • Restaurant diners abandon meals after cockroaches found

    Diners were forced to abandon their meals at an Indian restaurant after health inspectors found an infestation of cockroaches. Sand's in Leicester was shut with immediate effect following a tip-off from a member of the public. Inspectors found live adult and immature German cockroaches and egg cases in the main food preparation area and in its stores on 4 February. The restaurant on Station Road has not responded to requests for a comment. Blaby District Council said environmental health officers found live and dead cockroaches in the kitchen which had a "large quantity of uncovered food". A number of dead cockroaches were also discovered in "extremely dirty" conditions. On the restaurant's TripAdvisor

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  • The Engagement of 2 Children Aged 7 and 4 in Qaliubiyya Prompts Anger on Social Media

    Photos of an engagement ceremony held in Qaliubiya for a 7-year-old boy named Ziad and his 4-year-old cousin, Farida, went viral, sparking outrage on social media. Talking to Youm 7, Farida's father said that "everyone in the family was completely happy with the engagement." The father was also reported to have said that he had promised Ziad, who happens to be his nephew, that upon passing his second year of primary education, he can get engaged to Farida. EGP 18,000 worth of jewellery (shabka) was reportedly bought to Farida. According to a UNICEF 2016 report, 17% of Egyptians are already married before they turn 18.  Here's a sample of people's comments on the story: "I really can't understand

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  • ‘The Fast and the Furious’ to be re-released in cinemas to celebrate 15th anniversary

    "The Fast and the Furious", the first ever film in the franchise of the same name, is set to be re-released to mark the movie's 15th anniversary. Fans will be able to see the film on the big screen once again when it is released in around 1,500 cinemas on Wednesday June 22, the date when the original movie opened back in 2001. The original story follows a police officer in Los Angeles tasked with infiltrating and breaking up the street-racing scene, only to find himself hooked on the illegal sport. The film was a surprise hit at the time — partly due to a cast of mainly unknown actors and actresses — and has gone on to spawn six sequels to date. The original film featured male actors Paul Walker

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  • The world's most mysterious family tree

    Behind North Korea's ruling family is a tangled web of bizarre fates. It isn't just the puzzling, was-he-poisoned death of Kim Jong Un's older brother. Before that, there was the startling execution of his uncle. And, of course, the reason why Kim leapfrogged past his older brothers to become his country's Supreme Leader. Here's a look:

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  • Arrests made over death of Kim Jong-nam

    Malaysian police have detained a second woman believed to be connected to the death of Kim Jong-nam, the half-brother of North Korean leader Kim Jong-un, state media reported. Police Inspector General Tan Sri Khalid Abu Bakar confirmed the detention on Thursday and said an official statement would be released later in the day, state news agency Bernama said. On Wednesday, a woman carrying Vietnamese travel documents bearing the name Doan Thi Huong was arrested at Kuala Lumpur International Airport, the scene of Monday's poisoning. Police are also hunting for further suspects. Kim died on Monday after suddenly falling ill at Kuala Lumpur airport. He had been on his way to the Chinese territory

    Al Jazeera q
  • Children and Duterte's drug war: Lessons from the past

    Manila, Philippines - Jose flipped three coins into the air when two gunmen on a motorcycle opened fire. They shot the 15-year-old suspected drug user seven times. The boy hit the ground, along with the coins that he had tossed as part of a traditional Filipino game called hantak. He had been playing with his friends while selling cigarettes on a rundown street in Caloocan City. Jose, whose name has been changed for this story to ensure his safety, was taken to hospital. He survived, but is fearful of being targeted again. His attackers were never arrested. Now three months later - with vigilantes still on the prowl - he seldom goes out at night. Though his future remains uncertain, Jose acknowledges

    Al Jazeera q
  • Future of Palestine in the changing world order

    The mainstream American media were in full agreement: President Trump’s shift on the two-state solution, as evinced in his remarks last Wednesday during a white House press conference with Benjamin Netanyahu, has upended a long-held position by the US and by the international community. ‘Honest broker’ The vagueness of his remarks suggests that the businessman-turned-president has no inkling about diplomacy, least of all Mideast diplomacy, or about the complexities of the issues at hand in that part of the world Fawaz Turki The rabbit and fox proverb Last Update: Friday, 17 February 2017 KSA 10:37 - GMT 07:37 Disclaimer: Views expressed by writers in this section are their own and do not reflect

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  • Harrison Ford 'in near-miss' at US airport

    US actor Harrison Ford has been involved in a near-miss while flying his plane in California, US media say. They say Ford, aged 74, was instructed to land on a runway at John Wayne airport in Orange Country on Monday. But instead he mistakenly landed on a parallel taxiway, passing over a waiting American Airlines plane with 110 passengers and crew on board. That plane safely departed minutes later. Ford has not commented on the reported incident. Just before the landing, the Indiana Jones star is quoted as asking air traffic controllers: "Was that airliner meant to be underneath me?" The Federal Aviation Authority confirmed that the pilot of the single-engine Aviat Husky plane had been cleared

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  • Kendall Jenner reveals struggle with anxiety but 'is learning to cope'

    Kendall Jenner says she's been struggling with anxiety issues over the last year but is learning to cope. Writing on her own website, the reality TV star and model says she's learnt some breathing exercises which help. "Anxiety was a huge hurdle for me to deal with this past year (and security concerns didn't help), but I think I'm finally learning how to cope. "I once had a really bad attack on a plane and just had to ride it out," she writes. "I felt my heart beating a million miles an hour and I even went a little numb." She says she's now getting better at relaxing while working and travelling. "[I've] learned that it's all mental, so I try to prevent anxiety attacks by bringing my mind somewhere

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  • England's Big Picture: 13 - 19 February

    Each day we feature a photograph sent in from across England. At points throughout the year we may introduce a theme for the gallery - this week's theme is "love". Find out how you can submit your images and videos below. How to submit a picture If you have a picture you'd like to share, email us at england@bbc.co.uk, post it on Facebook or tweet it to @BBCEngland. You can also find us on Instagram - use #englandsbigpicture to share an image there. You can also see a recent archive of pictures on our England's Big Picture board on Pinterest. When emailing pictures, please make sure you include the following information: The full name of the person who took the pictures (as this person owns the

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  • Corruption Perceptions Index Names Egypt the 68th Most Corrupt Country in the World

    According to Transparency International’s Corruption Perceptions Index, Egypt ranks 108 out of 176 countries assessed for corruption in 2016, making it the 68th most corrupt country assessed. The Index uses a scale from 0 (highly corrupt) to 100 (very clean), with the global median sitting at 43 – below the midpoint. According to this scale, Egypt ranked 34 – well below the midpoint.  Somalia, South Sudan, and North Korea were the top three most corrupt countries that were assessed, scaled at 10, 11, and 12 respectively. The least corrupt countries assessed were New Zealand, Denmark, and Finland scaled at 90, 90, and 89 respectively. The assessment was reported based on a country’s ability to

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  • President Trump: Seven ways the world could change

    With Donald Trump in the White House, America's relationship with the rest of the world is on the verge of changing in some important ways. Here are seven of them. Nato faces a shake-up Mr Trump has been hugely critical of Nato (the North Atlantic Treaty Organization), a cornerstone of American foreign policy for more than 60 years. He has attacked the organisation as obsolete and characterised its members as ungrateful allies who benefit from US largesse. In one sense, Mr Trump's rhetoric simply gives voice to longstanding US concerns about most Nato members not meeting their goal of spending at least 2% of GDP on defence, while US defence spending is the largest in the world. More recently,

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  • Asia Madani and Ahmed Omar Set to Shake Things Up at Cairo Jazz Club with Their Afro Inspired Sounds

    Sudanese vocalist and percussionist Asia Madani has been living in Egypt since the turn of the millennium, when she moved here to pursue her musical career and never looked back. Her music is rooted in Sudanese folklore, where she showcases the traditional sounds of her home country, incorporating modern and traditional instruments, vocals, and dancing. Part of The Nile Project (a cross cultural musical project bridging gaps between Nile basin countries), Madani has been exposed to multitudes of different styles from different African cultural backgrounds. She played some of our country's biggest festivals and venues like Oshtoora, 3al Ganoob, Room Art Space, the Cairo Opera House, The Citadel

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  • Cabbage attack The Sun after being tipped for success

    Manchester band Cabbage have attacked The Sun, after the newspaper tipped them for success in 2017. The five piece were among seven acts the paper championed as "the next big thing". But the boys dismissed the tag, calling the paper "odious" and "backward". In a tweet they told fans: "Don't buy The Sun. Don't even walk past it without burning it, or spitting on it. They try to tell you what to think." The band, who are also on the BBC's Sound of 2017 longlist, continued: "They pay no attention to what is real. "They exploit every single one of you and affect the way you think. "Everyone has a member of their family or a friend affected by this awful repeated propaganda. It's a crime." The lads

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  • Russian provocation: Bluster or genuine peril

    Crammed with eavesdropping equipment, the Viktor Leonov has loitered in these waters before, but its current visit is the latest in a string of provocations. The last few years have seen dangerous Russian "fly-bys" of US warships, close encounters in the skies, when Russian military aircraft have flown with transponders switched off, and the occasional Russian submarine hiding in Swedish waters. Earlier this month, according to the Pentagon, four Russian jets flew in an "unsafe and unprofessional" manner near a U.S. Navy destroyer in the Black Sea. Such provocative acts could easily lead to unintended consequences at a time when, according to Russian Foreign Minister Sergei Lavrov, channels for avoiding misunderstandings are frozen.

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  • Journey to the dark web

    The dark web is the most hidden part of the internet where illegal items, from drugs to weapons, can be bought and sold anonymously. A Newsbeat investigation found that "millions of pounds of drugs are bought online every day" and delivered unknowingly by UK postal workers. Delivery staff who said they had "definitely handled suspect packages" told us there is "nothing they could do". Royal Mail says it does not knowingly carry any illegal items in its network. Most users access the dark web via free software which conceals their identities and their online activity from surveillance, such as the Tor browser. "Tor" stands for "The Onion Router" and it directs internet traffic through a vast network

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