• Gyllenhaal: Latest role is my superhero film

    CNN's Jake Tapper speaks to Boston bombing survivor Jeff Bauman and actor Jake Gyllenhaal, who plays him in a new film.

  • The enduring appeal of Audrey Hepburn

    More than 50 years after her iconic turn as Holly Golightly in Breakfast at Tiffany's, Audrey Hepburn's style is attracting the attention of a new generation of fashion lovers. A collection of the actress's little black dresses, trench coats and a sleeping mask are among thousands of personal items on display at Christie's in central London. Almost 500 lots are to be sold in the coming weeks, but it was not only potential buyers browsing the auction house as the exhibition opened on Saturday. A younger generation - many born after Hepburn's death nearly 25 years ago - are turning out to see the clothes worn by the 20th Century muse. Adrian Hume-Sayer, director of private collections at Christie's,

  • Stevie Wonder takes both knees 'for America'

    Trump criticized some in the NFL on Friday night at a rally in Alabama, saying team owners should fire players for taking a knee during the national anthem. His remarks appeared to refer to Colin Kaepernick -- formerly with the San Francisco 49ers, but currently without a team -- who last year drew national attention for refusing to stand during "The Star-Spangled Banner" prior to kickoff. "I am not going to stand up to show pride in a flag for a country that oppresses black people and people of color," Kaepernick said last year. Trump is responding a year later, saying if fans would "leave the stadium" when players kneel in protest during the national anthem, "I guarantee, things will stop."

  • The famed painters who vanished into obscurity

    Two exhibitions open this month devoted to a group of working class artists from the East End of London who became art world celebrities in the late 1920s and 1930s - only to be forgotten after World War Two. They were known as the East London Group, and among their ranks were humble office clerks, a navvy, a window cleaner, a shop assistant, a printer, a basket-weaver and an errand boy. Now they're being rediscovered, with one exhibition devoted to their work in Southampton, and another, curated by the children's author Michael Rosen and radio producer Emma-Louise Williams, on their home turf of Bow in East London. Though they had no formal art school training, the paintings they produced were

  • Marilyn Manson: Columbine massacre 'destroyed' my career

    The singer now says "If [the Columbine killers] had just bought my records, they would be better off. Certain people blame me for the shootings at schools." "That's going to be a great pull-quote for you," he told The Guardian. "But, honestly, the Columbine era destroyed my entire career at the time." Manson is currently promoting his new album titled "Heaven Upside Down." In 2012, he said the title for his "Born Villain" was influenced by having been been wrongfully vilified because of Columbine. "When it comes to things like Columbine, it would have been different if they [Harris and Klebold] had actually liked my music, but I think that I have had more blame accredited to me than any person

  • Soul singer Charles Bradley dies at 68

    But earlier this month, he canceled tour dates in the US, South America and Europe, saying his cancer has returned and spread to his liver, and he needed to focus on his treatment. "I love all of you out there that made my dreams come true. When I come back, I'll come back strong, with God's love. With God's will, I'll be back soon," he said. Bradley found fame in his later years, releasing his debut album "No Time For Dreaming" at age 62. The album was named Rolling Stone Magazine's top 50 albums of 2011. His next album, "Victim of Love," was released two years later, followed earlier this year by his third and last album, "Changes." He expressed his love for legendary singer James Brown, and

  • Mark Warner: I won't stop trying to expose fake Russia-linked Facebook ads

    Facebook continues to resist calls for public disclosure of the Russia-linked ads that targeted American voters last year. But Senator Mark Warner, the top Democrat on the Senate intelligence committee, is still pushing. "We want to try to find a way," he said, "to make some of those ads and other information public." Facebook provided data about the pro-Trump propaganda to special counsel Robert Mueller's team after Mueller obtained a search warrant earlier this month. At first Facebook declined to provide the data to Congressional investigators, but on Thursday the company reversed itself. "We've not received any of their information yet. They will disclose that to us next week," Warner said