• Senior Iranian military commander visits Moscow in violation of UN resolution

    Iranian Quds Force commander Qassem Soleimani traveled to Moscow, violating multiple United Nations resolutions forbidding him from leaving Iran, Fox News quoted US security sources saying. Soleimani is visiting Moscow to express his displeasure with the growing relations between Russia, Saudi Arabia and other Arab countries, in light of their weapons and economic deals, the report said.

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  • England's Big Picture: 13 - 19 February

    Each day we feature a photograph sent in from across England. At points throughout the year we may introduce a theme for the gallery - this week's theme is "love". Find out how you can submit your images and videos below. How to submit a picture If you have a picture you'd like to share, email us at england@bbc.co.uk, post it on Facebook or tweet it to @BBCEngland. You can also find us on Instagram - use #englandsbigpicture to share an image there. You can also see a recent archive of pictures on our England's Big Picture board on Pinterest. When emailing pictures, please make sure you include the following information: The full name of the person who took the pictures (as this person owns the

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  • Restaurant diners abandon meals after cockroaches found

    Diners were forced to abandon their meals at an Indian restaurant after health inspectors found an infestation of cockroaches. Sand's in Leicester was shut with immediate effect following a tip-off from a member of the public. Inspectors found live adult and immature German cockroaches and egg cases in the main food preparation area and in its stores on 4 February. The restaurant on Station Road has not responded to requests for a comment. Blaby District Council said environmental health officers found live and dead cockroaches in the kitchen which had a "large quantity of uncovered food". A number of dead cockroaches were also discovered in "extremely dirty" conditions. On the restaurant's TripAdvisor

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  • Google CEO Sundar Pichai writes back to girl, 7, who wants a job

    An "entrepreneurial" seven year old wrote to Google for a job and its CEO replied. After discussing her father's work, Chloe Bridgewater decided she would like to work for Google and penned a letter beginning "dear Google boss". It was only the schoolgirl's second letter, after her first missive to Father Christmas, but the search engine's CEO Sundar Pichai wrote back. Her father Andy said the girl "took it all in her stride". "We were gobsmacked, but I don't think Chloe could understand the magnitude of the reaction she'd got afterwards," said father Andy, a sales manager from Hereford. "She's got a great entrepreneurial spirit. Ever since nursery, she's always been told in school reports she's

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  • The world's most mysterious family tree

    Behind North Korea's ruling family is a tangled web of bizarre fates. It isn't just the puzzling, was-he-poisoned death of Kim Jong Un's older brother. Before that, there was the startling execution of his uncle. And, of course, the reason why Kim leapfrogged past his older brothers to become his country's Supreme Leader. Here's a look:

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  • The world's most unusual assassinations

    There is nothing new about a high-profile or outspoken person being assassinated. It is one of the oldest tools in the book to get rid of someone who is either too powerful, too dangerous or too inconvenient. But most assassins choose a straight-forward method: Julius Caesar was stabbed to death, Abraham Lincoln was shot. It is now being speculated that the death of Kim Jong-nam - Kim Jong-un's oldest half-brother - may have been another one. If that proves true, its rumoured method - which supposedly saw two female assassins placing a poison-laced handkerchief over his mouth as he walked through the airport - puts his assassination among a select list of those killed by people who have chosen

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  • President Trump: Seven ways the world could change

    With Donald Trump in the White House, America's relationship with the rest of the world is on the verge of changing in some important ways. Here are seven of them. Nato faces a shake-up Mr Trump has been hugely critical of Nato (the North Atlantic Treaty Organization), a cornerstone of American foreign policy for more than 60 years. He has attacked the organisation as obsolete and characterised its members as ungrateful allies who benefit from US largesse. In one sense, Mr Trump's rhetoric simply gives voice to longstanding US concerns about most Nato members not meeting their goal of spending at least 2% of GDP on defence, while US defence spending is the largest in the world. More recently,

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  • Egyptian Airport Security Victoriously 'Flips the Bird' After Confiscating EGP 1.36m Hidden in Ducks

    Earlier Today, EGP 1.36 million has been found stuffed in raw ducks in the luggage of a man en route to Kuwait, according to Al Wafd. Port security manager General Hossam Nasr caught the man, who goes by the name of Tamer, in customs, smuggling the duck-filled money in Asyut airport. Tamer’s luggage had initially passed the first phase of airport screening without the ducks being detected. After discovering the money hidden within the ducks, the team behind the bust decided to pose for a photo with one guard 'flipping the bird' in celebration, which has since gone viral on social media.  According to Sadaa News, The smuggler is an Egyptian who originally resides in Abnub, Asyut. He has a bachelor

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  • The Engagement of 2 Children Aged 7 and 4 in Qaliubiyya Prompts Anger on Social Media

    Photos of an engagement ceremony held in Qaliubiya for a 7-year-old boy named Ziad and his 4-year-old cousin, Farida, went viral, sparking outrage on social media. Talking to Youm 7, Farida's father said that "everyone in the family was completely happy with the engagement." The father was also reported to have said that he had promised Ziad, who happens to be his nephew, that upon passing his second year of primary education, he can get engaged to Farida. EGP 18,000 worth of jewellery (shabka) was reportedly bought to Farida. According to a UNICEF 2016 report, 17% of Egyptians are already married before they turn 18.  Here's a sample of people's comments on the story: "I really can't understand

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  • Corruption Perceptions Index Names Egypt the 68th Most Corrupt Country in the World

    According to Transparency International’s Corruption Perceptions Index, Egypt ranks 108 out of 176 countries assessed for corruption in 2016, making it the 68th most corrupt country assessed. The Index uses a scale from 0 (highly corrupt) to 100 (very clean), with the global median sitting at 43 – below the midpoint. According to this scale, Egypt ranked 34 – well below the midpoint.  Somalia, South Sudan, and North Korea were the top three most corrupt countries that were assessed, scaled at 10, 11, and 12 respectively. The least corrupt countries assessed were New Zealand, Denmark, and Finland scaled at 90, 90, and 89 respectively. The assessment was reported based on a country’s ability to

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  • Cabbage attack The Sun after being tipped for success

    Manchester band Cabbage have attacked The Sun, after the newspaper tipped them for success in 2017. The five piece were among seven acts the paper championed as "the next big thing". But the boys dismissed the tag, calling the paper "odious" and "backward". In a tweet they told fans: "Don't buy The Sun. Don't even walk past it without burning it, or spitting on it. They try to tell you what to think." The band, who are also on the BBC's Sound of 2017 longlist, continued: "They pay no attention to what is real. "They exploit every single one of you and affect the way you think. "Everyone has a member of their family or a friend affected by this awful repeated propaganda. It's a crime." The lads

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  • Face transplant recipient overwhelmed by result

    On 16 June last year, Andy Sandness was wheeled into an operating theatre at the Mayo Clinic in Rochester, Minnesota, to undergo one of the rarest surgeries in the world. Three weeks later, he would gaze in a mirror, unsure what he would see. Reflected back at him was the face of another man: the nose, cheeks, mouth, lips, jaw, chin and even the teeth of his donor, Calen Ross. What the two men had in common was that they had both, at the age of 21, turned a gun on themselves. Unable to speak clearly after seeing his new face, Mr Sandness wrote a note for his doctors and family to read: "Far exceeded my expectations." Mr Sandness, from Wyoming, was left with a face almost completely destroyed

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  • ‘The Fast and the Furious’ to be re-released in cinemas to celebrate 15th anniversary

    "The Fast and the Furious", the first ever film in the franchise of the same name, is set to be re-released to mark the movie's 15th anniversary. Fans will be able to see the film on the big screen once again when it is released in around 1,500 cinemas on Wednesday June 22, the date when the original movie opened back in 2001. The original story follows a police officer in Los Angeles tasked with infiltrating and breaking up the street-racing scene, only to find himself hooked on the illegal sport. The film was a surprise hit at the time — partly due to a cast of mainly unknown actors and actresses — and has gone on to spawn six sequels to date. The original film featured male actors Paul Walker

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  • Iranian president supports Amir's call for dialogue

    Rouhani visits Kuwait, Oman to improve ties KUWAIT: Iranian President Hassan Rouhani visited Kuwait yesterday as part of a lightning two-nation Gulf tour aimed at mending ties strained by the conflicts in Syria and Yemen. Rouhani held talks with HH the Amir Sheikh Sabah Al-Ahmad Al-Jaber Al-Sabah, who last month launched a dialogue with the Islamic republic to normalize Iran-Gulf relations. An official statement cited by the KUNA news agency said they discussed bolstering bilateral ties in all fields. They also held talks on “latest regional and international developments,” said the statement, without giving further details. Ahead of his visit to Oman and Kuwait, Rouhani had expressed support

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  • Zayn Malik defends Gigi Hadid after 'racist' Snapchat video

    Zayn Malik has defended his girlfriend Gigi Hadid in a single tweet after her sister Bella posted a Snapchat video of her. In it, Gigi holds up a Buddha-shaped cookie, squints her eyes and smiles. Bella has since deleted it after fans called the model racist against Asians. But it's still been widely shared online. Critics were keen to highlight Zayn's Asian heritage, prompting him to defend her. After being questioned by fans about the video, Zayn replied to one saying: "Trust me.. she likes asians ;)". Gigi Hadid was named international model of the year at the 2016 Fashion Awards last December. But this isn't the first time she's been criticised. She had to apologise after co-hosting the American

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  • Could your fingerprints be stolen from your peace sign?

    A Japanese researcher says doing the peace sign in a photo could lead to your fingerprints being stolen. They might be easy to recreate if your digits are "in focus with strong lighting". That claim is from Isao Echizen, from the National Institute of Informatics (NIII), who says prints could then be made "widely available". With fingerprint log-ins on phones and things like banking apps now common, the potential risks are clear. Echuzen also says advanced technology is not needed and that anyone could easily copy fingerprints. Researchers have come up with solution... it's interesting The NII says it has developed a transparent film that can be attached to your fingers, before you go waving

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  • Asia Madani and Ahmed Omar Set to Shake Things Up at Cairo Jazz Club with Their Afro Inspired Sounds

    Sudanese vocalist and percussionist Asia Madani has been living in Egypt since the turn of the millennium, when she moved here to pursue her musical career and never looked back. Her music is rooted in Sudanese folklore, where she showcases the traditional sounds of her home country, incorporating modern and traditional instruments, vocals, and dancing. Part of The Nile Project (a cross cultural musical project bridging gaps between Nile basin countries), Madani has been exposed to multitudes of different styles from different African cultural backgrounds. She played some of our country's biggest festivals and venues like Oshtoora, 3al Ganoob, Room Art Space, the Cairo Opera House, The Citadel

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  • Video: Boy cries for dad after losing legs

    Video shows the aftermath of an apparent air raid in the northwest province in Idlib in northwestern Syria. The video was circulated by Syrian opposition activists on social media.

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  • Nicole Kidman: I wish I'd had more children, 10/01/2017, Victoria Derbyshire

    Nicole Kidman tells Victoria she was brought to tears by the “beautiful” depiction of an adoptive mother’s love in her latest film, Lion.The film – based on a true story – sees Kidman’s character Sue Brierley adopt a five-year-old boy, Saroo. The actress, who has two adopted children in real life, also told Victoria that she would like more children of her own, but that her husband Keith Urban has told her to "shut down" such thoughts.

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  • Al Bab: 'When the tide is turning, ISIL go apocalyptic'

    In recent weeks, the Turkish-led Operation Euphrates Shield has made significant progress against ISIL around the city of Al Bab in northern Syria. Russia, a key ally during the operation, has provided Turkey with military and diplomatic support. The takeover of Al Bab would effectively prevent Kurdish forces from establishing a land corridor between the two territories they control in northern Syria - one of the main goals of Turkey's military operation. It would also provide Turkey with an important strategic advantage in possible operations against the ISIL, the Islamic State of Iraq and the Levant, which is also known as ISIS, and Kurdish forces. But analysts say that Ankara's plans to push

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