• In pictures: Oscars ceremony 2017

    A look at the winners and on-stage antics at the 89th Academy Awards in Los Angeles, California.

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  • Oscars: The winners list

    Chat with us in Facebook Messenger. Find out what's happening in the world as it unfolds.

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  • Cheryl 'confirms' her pregnancy in photo from youth charity campaign launch

    Cheryl has confirmed she's pregnant for the first time while helping to launch a new charity youth campaign. The 33-year-old singer has previously refused to comment on whether she and Liam Payne were expecting a child. But this time there's no doubt, with Cheryl showing off a noticeable bump. The Prince's Trust and L'Oreal Paris are launching a three-year project aimed at helping raise the confidence of 10,000 young people across the UK struggling with self-doubt. Stars like Dame Helen Mirren and Katie Piper are also featured in the photo for a new programme called All Worth It. The Prince's Trust says it launched the campaign after a study it carried out suggested that one in three young people

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  • What is the 'hairy blob' or globster found on the Philippines shore?

    A six-metre-long "hairy" sea creature has washed up on the shore of Dinagat Island in the Philippines and people have been questioning what it is. An unidentified creature like this is often known as a "globster" and they've been washing up for years. While some people think it might be new species, experts aren't convinced. Lucy Babey, head of science and conservation for the animal charity Orca, says it's definitely the carcass of a dead animal - probably a whale. "It's definitely a very decomposed sea creature in the later stages of decomposition," she tells Newsbeat. "The carcass is about six metres long, but that's obviously not the whole carcass - there's no tail so it would have been bigger

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  • New hope for Yazidi women raped, tortured by Daesh fighters

    DOHUK, Iraq: It has been less than two weeks since Perwin Ali Baku escaped Daesh, after more than two years in captivity, bought and sold from fighter to fighter and carted from Iraq to Syria and then back again. “I don’t feel right,” she said, sitting on a mattress on the floor of her father-in-law’s small canvas-topped Quonset hut in a northern Iraq refugee camp. Perwin wants treatment, and is hoping to find it in a new psychological trauma institute being established at the university of Dohuk, the first in the entire region. It is the next phase of an ambitious project funded by the wealthy German state of Baden Wuerttemberg that brought 1,100 women who had escaped Daesh captivity, primarily Yazidis, to Germany for psychological treatment.

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  • Israeli minister: The Bible says West Bank is ours

    Last week, in a joint press conference with Israeli Prime Minister Benjamin Netanyahu, US President Donald Trump surprised the world by appearing to dismiss a long-standing US commitment to a two-state solution to the Israeli-Palestinian conflict. Prominent hard-right Israeli Education Minister, Naftali Bennett, welcomed the statement saying: "The era of a Palestinian state is over." "There already exists two states for the Palestinians: one in Gaza, a full blown state run by Hamas, and the other is Jordan, where 70 percent of the citizens are, indeed, Palestinians," Bennett told UpFront. "So, the discussion is whether we need a third Palestinian state smack in the heart of Israel, and the answer

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  • Oscars 2017: Which celebrities will get political?

    When the Oscars comes around on Sunday, there may be so many anti-Trump speeches they may need an award for the best one. This year, perhaps more than ever, the ceremony will be about who says what as much as who wins what and who wears what. Five weeks on from President Trump's inauguration, with the nation divided over the US president and his policies, many Hollywood stars will feel the need to take a stand on the biggest stage of all. Meryl Streep got the ball rolling at the Golden Globes seven weeks ago. That made her even more of a hero in Hollywood, pretty much secured her an Oscar nomination and gave other actors licence to speak out too. It's likely that most of those who want to make

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  • The challenges of journalism in Duterte's Philippines

    On The Listening Post this week: More than 7,000 people have died since President Rodrigo Duterte took office almost eight months ago and ordered an unprecedented crime war that has drawn global criticism for alleged human rights abuses. As most polls show Filipinos are in support of Duterte's "war on drugs"; they oppose a culture of impunity. The president's campaign to eradicate drugs has been a big news story that has spawned the careers of Manila's "night crawlers" - photographers covering the "war on drugs".  Al Jazeera also interviews Marites Vitug, the editor-at-large of online news site Rappler, on the current state of the news media in the Philippines. Contributors: Vincent Go, photojournalist,

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  • Saudis await visitors but will they come?

    RIYADH // It’s the day before the grand opening of Shaden, a luxury desert camp in Saudi Arabia where air-conditioned tents look out on sandstone cliffs. A princely delegation is on its way. But the place isn’t quite ready. Peacocks for the garden of the 10,000-riyals-a-night royal suite have not arrived. The cow brought in to provide fresh milk for the cafe has been mooing all night. "He won’t shut up," laments Ahmed Al Said, the project developer, as he gives orders over the clang of hammers and shovels. Saudi Arabia as a whole isn’t ready for tourists either. But its rulers are intent on revolutionising the economy, and tourism is high on their list. They figure it can create jobs for a youthful

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  • Focus on the Philippines: Supercouple AlDub to star in first TV series

    Alden Richards and Maine "Yaya Dub" Mendoza, known as the popular on-screen couple AlDub (a portmanteau of their names), will appear in their first romantic-comedy television series. The programme, titled Destined to be Yours, will air daily on the Filipino network GMA Network beginning February 27. The show will also air worldwide, including in the UAE, on the international network GMA Pinoy TV. The show marks the duo’s first television project since they catapulted into fame on the variety programme Eat Bulaga!, where they have appeared on a fictional rom-com segment since the summer of 2015. "I am excited to finally see the things we have been working on," said 21-year-old Mendoza, who was

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  • Indonesia: Suspect was paid $90 to attack North Korean leader's brother

    Indonesian Siti Aisyah is seen in this undated handout released by the Royal Malaysia Police on February 19, 2017. Siti Aisyah was arrested in connection with the murder of Kim Jong Nam. (Royal Malaysia Police/Handout via Reuters) KUALA LUMPUR, Malaysia: Indonesia’s deputy ambassador to Malaysia says the Indonesian suspect in the death of North Korean leader Kim Jong Un’s half brother was paid $90 to help carry out the attack involving VX nerve agent. But Deputy Ambassador Andriano Erwin repeated Siti Aisyah’s previous claim that she was duped into the plot, thinking she was taking part in a prank. Erwin met Aisyah on Saturday in Malaysia, where the 25-year-old is in custody. Another alleged

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  • The woman who knows who's won the Oscars... but won't tell

    On Sunday, the eyes of the world will be on the Oscars. But two people already know who's won. You've never heard of Martha Ruiz and Brian Cullinan. They haven't been in any films or on any magazine covers. But they will be the most important people at the Oscars. They are the only two people in the world who know the names of the winners before each award presenter rips open the golden envelope and says the immortal words: "And the Oscar goes to..." Ruiz and Cullinan have counted the votes - and counted them again, and again, to make sure the results are correct. By Sunday night, they will have made sure the results are kept secret and delivered to the venue, no matter what, before personally

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  • Russia's new game in Afghanistan

    A resurgent Russia is making new inroads into Afghanistan, not in the way the former USSR did, but by aligning itself with some of the very extremists whose leaders were involved in the defeat of the Soviet Union's decade-long invasion of Afghanistan. In December 2016, Moscow disclosed its contacts with the Taliban, the group that is intent on toppling the Afghan government. The Russian Foreign Ministry announced that it is sharing intelligence and cooperating with the Taliban to fight Islamic State of Iraq and the Levant group's (ISIL, also known as ISIS) militants in Afghanistan. Moscow has repeatedly declared its concerns about ISIL militants, in many instances exaggerating their presence and power in Afghanistan.

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  • Several agreements to be signed during King Salman Asian tour

    Saudi Arabia’s King Salman Salman bin Abdulaziz al-Saud will embark on a five-nation Asian tour next week. Several landmark pacts are expected to be signed during the 31-day long historic and unprecedented royal visit to East Asia. Leading a strong contingent comprising several ministers and high ranking officials, the King will arrive in Kuala Lumpur on the first leg of his visit. After spending three days in Malaysia, King Salman will head to Indonesia for a 12-day official visit.

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  • Genghis Khan: Could satellites help find his tomb?

    For Shay Har-Noy it was an 800-year-old puzzle about the burial place of Mongolian ruler Genghis Khan that sparked a very 21st Century business. Mr Har-Noy was on an expedition to locate the lost tomb of the Mongol Empire founder, when satellite imagery firm DigitalGlobe donated some photos of potential areas for his team to scrutinise. These images, taken from space, were enormous, and as nobody knows what the tomb actually looked like, there was no obvious place to start the search. So Mr Har-Noy decided to crowdsource for clues. He returned to Mongolia three times to investigate what he calls "anomalies" in the photographs, submitted by eagle-eyed armchair enthusiasts. Could one of these have

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  • Egyptian Airport Security Victoriously 'Flips the Bird' After Confiscating EGP 1.36m Hidden in Ducks

    Earlier Today, EGP 1.36 million has been found stuffed in raw ducks in the luggage of a man en route to Kuwait, according to Al Wafd. Port security manager General Hossam Nasr caught the man, who goes by the name of Tamer, in customs, smuggling the duck-filled money in Asyut airport. Tamer’s luggage had initially passed the first phase of airport screening without the ducks being detected. After discovering the money hidden within the ducks, the team behind the bust decided to pose for a photo with one guard 'flipping the bird' in celebration, which has since gone viral on social media.  According to Sadaa News, The smuggler is an Egyptian who originally resides in Abnub, Asyut. He has a bachelor

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  • Melania Trump drops controversial language from $150 million defamation suit

    Washington (CNN)Lawyers for first lady Melania Trump changed and refiled her multimillion dollar defamation lawsuit against Daily Mail Online on Friday in New York. Trump is suing the media outlet for publishing a false story that claimed, falsely, she worked for a high-end escort service. The new version of the lawsuit leaves out a controversial portion of the original -- a section that argued the first lady's earning potential as a brand spokeswoman would be irretrievably damaged by the defamation. Critics questioned whether Trump would be attempting to cash in on her high-profile status as first lady of the United States. The original language, which has now been removed, stated: "Plaintiff

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  • Security information director: Iran asked Al-Zarqawi to kill Iraqi Shiites

    JEDDAH: Col. Fahd Abdul Aziz Al-Ghufeili, director of information management and online public administration for intellectual security, on Tuesday said new evidence has emerged of Iran’s involvement to back Al-Qaeda and Daesh in an attempt to weaken Iraq’s American invasion resistance after the Iraq war in 2003. He said that Iran asked the late Abu Musab Al-Zarqawi, a member of Al-Qaeda in Iraq, to kill Iraqi Shiites who were standing with the Sunnis to resist the occupation. Osama Bin Laden then asked Al-Zarqawi not to kill the Shiites due to to Al-Qaeda’s interests with Iran; Iran had separate plans to create disputes between the parties. Al-Ghufeili made his remarks during a lecture to students

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  • Where was Sasha during Obama's farewell speech?

    Where was Sasha Obama? The goodbye photo clearly only shows 18-year-old Malia Obama on stage with mum and dad, Michelle and Barack, but there's no sign of her 15-year-old sister. ***Spoiler*** The simple explanation is that she stayed in Washington because she had an exam at Sidwell Friends private school on Wednesday morning. The school has educated the children of American presidents for years, including Chelsea Clinton. So it will be used to cracking down on pupils for trying to miss class because of official presidential engagements. But that didn't stop the #WhereIsSasha fun on social media. Some people hoped she was trying to stop Donald Trump getting into the White House Some tweeters

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  • The Engagement of 2 Children Aged 7 and 4 in Qaliubiyya Prompts Anger on Social Media

    Photos of an engagement ceremony held in Qaliubiya for a 7-year-old boy named Ziad and his 4-year-old cousin, Farida, went viral, sparking outrage on social media. Talking to Youm 7, Farida's father said that "everyone in the family was completely happy with the engagement." The father was also reported to have said that he had promised Ziad, who happens to be his nephew, that upon passing his second year of primary education, he can get engaged to Farida. EGP 18,000 worth of jewellery (shabka) was reportedly bought to Farida. According to a UNICEF 2016 report, 17% of Egyptians are already married before they turn 18.  Here's a sample of people's comments on the story: "I really can't understand

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