• CNN Money

    Katie Couric returns to NBC to co-host the Olympics

    Katie Couric will return to the Olympics next month. The former "Today" show anchor will co-host the opening ceremony for the Winter Games in PyeongChang, NBC announced Wednesday. "I'm really excited to dive in and start really educating myself about this particular Olympics," Couric told CNNMoney. "For this one I think the geopolitical backdrop is so much more intense than previous games." She said it'll be her job to try to balance the political without letting "it eclipse the wonderful stories of determination and resilience and sacrifice that are part and parcel of every athlete who makes it to this level of competition." Couric will join Mike Tirico, who's replacing Bob Costas as NBC's primetime

  • CNN Money

    Ann Curry on Matt Lauer: 'I am not surprised by the allegations'

    Ann Curry says she's "not surprised" by the sexual misconduct allegations against her former "Today" co-anchor Matt Lauer. In an interview on "CBS This Morning," Curry declined to say much more about Lauer, who was fired in November. But in response to questions about the reckoning over sexual harassment and abuse, Curry said that "we clearly are waking up to a reality and injustice that has been occurring for some time." She also described a "climate of verbal harassment" at NBC. Curry left the network in 2015. "I would be surprised if many women did not understand that there was a climate of verbal harassment that existed," Curry said. "I think it'd be surprising if someone said that they didn't

  • CNN Money

    Trump averages a 'fake' insult every day. Really. We counted.

    President Trump has used the word "fake" more than 400 times since he was inaugurated. More than once a day, on average, he has publicly assailed "fake news," "fake polls," "fake media," and "fake stories." Over and over again, he has told the United States not to trust what reporters say. His allies have done the same thing. This repetition -- constantly labeling real news as "fake" -- is what has made the slur so powerful. In the run-up to the 2016 election, "fake news" was a term used by researchers and journalists to describe hoaxes that were designed to deceive people. These made-up stories are typically promoted via social media, either to make money or spread propaganda. But after Trump

  • BBC News

    'I like drawing animals with clothes on'

    Axel Scheffler is the illustrator who’s brought hundreds of children’s characters to life, including The Gruffalo and The Highway Rat. This is how he came up with them, and why he’s chosen to do this job. Hear more on Axel's recent work on The Cultural Frontline from BBC World Service. Video filmed and edited by Ellen Tsang and Rajni Boddington.

  • BBC News

    'Cannabis helped my frightening tremors'

    A mother-of-two with multiple sclerosis has described how a form of cannabis has helped ease her symptoms. Rhian Cowen, 46, from Pembroke Dock, was suffering from tremors and agonising migraines and said: "I was coming home in tears because I managed to get through the day." While she does not use illegally obtained cannabis, she uses products which contain CBD - a non-psychoactive substance found in cannabis - which are not currently licensed for medical use in the UK but are sold online as supplements. Her story comes as assembly members backed calls to legalise medicinal cannabis.

  • CNN

    Late night pokes fun at Trump's health exam

    Comedians including Trevor Noah and Stephen Colbert give their take on President Trump's health exam.

  • CNN

    Obama team bids wistful farewell in 'The Final Year'

    (CNN)Designed to make President Obama's supporters wistful and seemingly to irritate President Trump, "The Final Year" is an intriguing if overtly nostalgic fly-on-the-wall glimpse into the last year of the former's presidency, chronicled through the perspective of his national-security team. Theatrically releasing this HBO-bound documentary almost a year to the day of Trump's inauguration, obviously, isn't an accident, any more than the throwback credits, which introduce the key players in big bold letters as "starring" in the documentary, as if this were a 1970s drama. Director Greg Barker's feature-length film is nevertheless an illuminating if somewhat soft-focused look at the brinkmanship and delicacy associated with international relations, one that clearly contrasts the diplomatic efforts of these wonk-ish Obama insiders -- principally former Secretary of State John Kerry, U.N. ambassador Samantha Power, National Security Adviser Susan Rice, and deputy adviser Ben Rhodes -- with the Trump administration's proverbial bull-in-the-china-shop approach.