• In pictures: Oscars ceremony 2017

    A look at the winners and on-stage antics at the 89th Academy Awards in Los Angeles, California.

    BBC News q
  • Jordanian F16 pilot survives crash in Saudi’s Najran

    A Jordanian F16 fighter jet commander survived a crash that occurred on Friday in Saudi Arabia’s Najran, a military source from the Jordanian armed forces reported. The source reported that the pilot, Adnan Naim Abdulaziz Nabbas, was flying the jet – which is part of the Arab coalition – when it crashed inside Saudi Arabia.

    News q
  • Manila's nightcrawlers capture Duterte's drug war

    Since coming to power last June, Philippine President Rodrigo Duterte has been on a mission to eradicate what he claims is the country's pandemic drug problem. Police records show about 7,000 Filipinos have been killed since then. One-third of those deaths have occurred during police operations, but the rest have been attributed to unknown gunmen in a wave of vigilantism that has been unleashed by the rhetoric of the president himself, critics say. This campaign, what Duterte calls a "war on drugs", has created a new beat for a group of photojournalists who have come to be known as the "nightcrawlers". Each night they gather at the Ermita police station in downtown Manila and wait for word about

    Al Jazeera q
  • What is the 'hairy blob' or globster found on the Philippines shore?

    A six-metre-long "hairy" sea creature has washed up on the shore of Dinagat Island in the Philippines and people have been questioning what it is. An unidentified creature like this is often known as a "globster" and they've been washing up for years. While some people think it might be new species, experts aren't convinced. Lucy Babey, head of science and conservation for the animal charity Orca, says it's definitely the carcass of a dead animal - probably a whale. "It's definitely a very decomposed sea creature in the later stages of decomposition," she tells Newsbeat. "The carcass is about six metres long, but that's obviously not the whole carcass - there's no tail so it would have been bigger

    BBC Radio 1 Newsbeat q
  • What is behind the hostility between Iran and Turkey?

    Diplomatic tensions between Iran and Turkey will not result in an actual confrontation due to the vast economic ties between the regional rivals, Turkish analysts say. As both regional rivals compete for a greater share of influence in the region, the Syrian government's victory in Aleppo, coupled with the Islamic State of Iraq and the Levant (ISIL, also known as ISIS) group's diminishing presence in Iraq, has brought tensions between them to the boil. "The tensions between Turkey and Iran did not appear out of the blue," said Atilla Yesilada, a political analyst with Istanbul's Global Source Partners. Recent developments in Syria and Iraq simply forced the two countries to be more overtly aggressive against each other," Yesilada told Al Jazeera.

    Al Jazeera q
  • Indonesia: Suspect was paid $90 to attack North Korean leader's brother

    Indonesian Siti Aisyah is seen in this undated handout released by the Royal Malaysia Police on February 19, 2017. Siti Aisyah was arrested in connection with the murder of Kim Jong Nam. (Royal Malaysia Police/Handout via Reuters) KUALA LUMPUR, Malaysia: Indonesia’s deputy ambassador to Malaysia says the Indonesian suspect in the death of North Korean leader Kim Jong Un’s half brother was paid $90 to help carry out the attack involving VX nerve agent. But Deputy Ambassador Andriano Erwin repeated Siti Aisyah’s previous claim that she was duped into the plot, thinking she was taking part in a prank. Erwin met Aisyah on Saturday in Malaysia, where the 25-year-old is in custody. Another alleged

    Arab News q
  • The woman who knows who's won the Oscars... but won't tell

    On Sunday, the eyes of the world will be on the Oscars. But two people already know who's won. You've never heard of Martha Ruiz and Brian Cullinan. They haven't been in any films or on any magazine covers. But they will be the most important people at the Oscars. They are the only two people in the world who know the names of the winners before each award presenter rips open the golden envelope and says the immortal words: "And the Oscar goes to..." Ruiz and Cullinan have counted the votes - and counted them again, and again, to make sure the results are correct. By Sunday night, they will have made sure the results are kept secret and delivered to the venue, no matter what, before personally

    BBC News q
  • Growing gulf

    Authorities in Gulf Cooperation Council (GCC) countries have warned that the large number of expatriate workers in the region are causing imbalances in the demographic structures of member states and as a result, they have called for measures to be taken to rectify the issue. Gulf countries have failed to keep the number of recruited expatriate workers limited to a certain percentage of the population even though Gulf labor ministers agreed that the percentage of expatriate workers in any member state should not exceed 20 percent. Statistical reports have shown that the United Arab Emirates and Qatar account for the largest number of expatriate workers in the Gulf region with 89 percent in both, followed by Kuwait at 69 percent, Bahrain at 52 percent, Oman at 46 percent and Saudi Arabia at 33 percent.

    Saudi Gazette q
  • Palestinian Christian Yacoub Shaheen wins Arab Idol

    Hundreds of Palestinians are celebrating in Bethlehem after a young singer from the occupied West Bank city became the second Palestinian to win the Arab Idol television song contest. Yacoub Shaheen, the 23-year-old son of a Syriac Christian carpenter, on Saturday night won the pan-Arab singing competition, defeating a fellow Palestinian and a Yemeni in the finals filmed in Lebanon. He became the second Palestinian to win the contest after Mohammed Assaf, who was raised in a refugee camp in the Gaza Strip, won Arab Idol against all odds aged 23 in 2013. Hundreds of people, including the town mayor, gathered in front of a large screen in Bethlehem's Manger Square to watch Shaheen sing in the final

    Al Jazeera q
  • Where was Sasha during Obama's farewell speech?

    Where was Sasha Obama? The goodbye photo clearly only shows 18-year-old Malia Obama on stage with mum and dad, Michelle and Barack, but there's no sign of her 15-year-old sister. ***Spoiler*** The simple explanation is that she stayed in Washington because she had an exam at Sidwell Friends private school on Wednesday morning. The school has educated the children of American presidents for years, including Chelsea Clinton. So it will be used to cracking down on pupils for trying to miss class because of official presidential engagements. But that didn't stop the #WhereIsSasha fun on social media. Some people hoped she was trying to stop Donald Trump getting into the White House Some tweeters

    BBC Radio 1 Newsbeat q
  • Mavericks send Bogut to 76ers in Noel deal

    NEW YORK — Australian center Andrew Bogut has been traded from the Dallas Mavericks to the Philadelphia 76ers in an NBA deal sending forward Nerlens Noel to Dallas. As the league’s transfer window slammed shut Thursday ahead of the resumption of games after the NBA All-Star break, teams made final moves to tweak rosters for playoff runs or to reduce their payrolls in hopes of free agency spending next July. The Mavericks confirmed the widely reported deal with Philadelphia, which sees the Mavericks also send guard Justin Anderson and a first-round NBA Draft choice. The 22-year-old Noel used Twitter to thank Philadelphia fans for supporting him. “To have such an amazing city embrace a kid from

    Saudi Gazette q
  • L&T to induct local talent for Saudi projects

    Larsen & Toubro (L&T), the $16 billion Indian technology, engineering, construction, and manufacturing and financial services conglomerate, has announced plans to induct fresh local talent as part of its Graduate Engineer Training (GET) program for various operational and management functions for its projects in Saudi Arabia. The initiative is driven by the Power Transmission & Distribution (PT&D) business vertical that resides within L&T Construction, the construction arm of L&T. It is the largest construction organization in India and is among the top 30 contractors globally. Top officials of the company from the PT&D business first approached the deans and managements of the King Fahd University

    Arab News q
  • Nicki Minaj's LA mansion's burgled with £140,000 of jewellery and property taken

    Police in LA are investigating a burglary at Nicki Minaj's home after £140,000 worth of her belongings were stolen. It happened at her luxury mansion in Beverly Hills but the rapper wasn't there at the time. It's reported the home was vandalised during the raid, with some of Nicki Minaj's clothing cut up. There's been no word from Nicki about it.

    BBC Radio 1 Newsbeat q
  • What do donkeys and Trump have to do with this Indian election?

    It's election season in India's most populous state. Whoever wins the polls in the northern state of Uttar Pradesh will, for the next five years, rule a population that's larger than the combined size of Britain, France, Germany and Sweden. The stakes are high and in their desperation to grab the eyeballs of the 222 million plus people, some of India's top politicians are indulging in mudslinging and name calling, some of which are very, well, creative. The BBC's Geeta Pandey in Delhi compiles a list of bizarre barbs and rants the political leaders are throwing at each other. A very 'grave' matter Earlier this week, Prime Minister Narendra Modi's speech at an election rally in Fatehpur took a

    BBC News q
  • Kendall Jenner reveals struggle with anxiety but 'is learning to cope'

    Kendall Jenner says she's been struggling with anxiety issues over the last year but is learning to cope. Writing on her own website, the reality TV star and model says she's learnt some breathing exercises which help. "Anxiety was a huge hurdle for me to deal with this past year (and security concerns didn't help), but I think I'm finally learning how to cope. "I once had a really bad attack on a plane and just had to ride it out," she writes. "I felt my heart beating a million miles an hour and I even went a little numb." She says she's now getting better at relaxing while working and travelling. "[I've] learned that it's all mental, so I try to prevent anxiety attacks by bringing my mind somewhere

    BBC Radio 1 Newsbeat q
  • Zayn Malik defends Gigi Hadid after 'racist' Snapchat video

    Zayn Malik has defended his girlfriend Gigi Hadid in a single tweet after her sister Bella posted a Snapchat video of her. In it, Gigi holds up a Buddha-shaped cookie, squints her eyes and smiles. Bella has since deleted it after fans called the model racist against Asians. But it's still been widely shared online. Critics were keen to highlight Zayn's Asian heritage, prompting him to defend her. After being questioned by fans about the video, Zayn replied to one saying: "Trust me.. she likes asians ;)". Gigi Hadid was named international model of the year at the 2016 Fashion Awards last December. But this isn't the first time she's been criticised. She had to apologise after co-hosting the American

    BBC Radio 1 Newsbeat q
  • Nicole Kidman: I wish I'd had more children, 10/01/2017, Victoria Derbyshire

    Nicole Kidman tells Victoria she was brought to tears by the “beautiful” depiction of an adoptive mother’s love in her latest film, Lion.The film – based on a true story – sees Kidman’s character Sue Brierley adopt a five-year-old boy, Saroo. The actress, who has two adopted children in real life, also told Victoria that she would like more children of her own, but that her husband Keith Urban has told her to "shut down" such thoughts.

    BBC q
  • Kim Jong-nam death: Unravelling the mystery

    It's got all the markings of a John Le Carre novel: the killing of the North Korean leader's brother with one of the deadliest chemical weapons created by man. But who by? And why? Many questions remain unanswered. Here's a look back at how the killing unfolded, the details that emerged, and the subsequent accusations and diplomatic row. 13 February - The airport attack He was waiting at a budget departure hall inside Kuala Lumpur international airport when the attack happened. Leaked CCTV footage would later show the 45-year-old man loitering in the budget terminal, a rucksack slung over his soldier, ahead of his return flight to the Chinese territory of Macau at 10:00. Suddenly a woman in a

    BBC News q
  • The Engagement of 2 Children Aged 7 and 4 in Qaliubiyya Prompts Anger on Social Media

    Photos of an engagement ceremony held in Qaliubiya for a 7-year-old boy named Ziad and his 4-year-old cousin, Farida, went viral, sparking outrage on social media. Talking to Youm 7, Farida's father said that "everyone in the family was completely happy with the engagement." The father was also reported to have said that he had promised Ziad, who happens to be his nephew, that upon passing his second year of primary education, he can get engaged to Farida. EGP 18,000 worth of jewellery (shabka) was reportedly bought to Farida. According to a UNICEF 2016 report, 17% of Egyptians are already married before they turn 18.  Here's a sample of people's comments on the story: "I really can't understand

    cairoscene.com q
  • Genghis Khan: Could satellites help find his tomb?

    For Shay Har-Noy it was an 800-year-old puzzle about the burial place of Mongolian ruler Genghis Khan that sparked a very 21st Century business. Mr Har-Noy was on an expedition to locate the lost tomb of the Mongol Empire founder, when satellite imagery firm DigitalGlobe donated some photos of potential areas for his team to scrutinise. These images, taken from space, were enormous, and as nobody knows what the tomb actually looked like, there was no obvious place to start the search. So Mr Har-Noy decided to crowdsource for clues. He returned to Mongolia three times to investigate what he calls "anomalies" in the photographs, submitted by eagle-eyed armchair enthusiasts. Could one of these have

    BBC News q