• UAE’s ‘Look East’ policy is developing

    One of the first participants to speak at the World Government Summit in Dubai this week was also one of the most prominent: Shinzo Abe, the prime minister of Japan. There were many global figures at the event, including current and former heads of state, but Mr Abe’s speech was given prime billing. That makes sense. The UAE’s future is increasingly dependent on its alliances and interactions with its Asian partners. The facts are well-known. Just weeks ago, Sheikh Mohammed bin Zayed, Crown Prince of Abu Dhabi and Deputy Supreme Commander of the Armed Forces, was in New Delhi as guest of honour for Republic Day celebrations. Trade with India is vital, worth hundreds of billions of dirhams per

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  • The world's most unusual assassinations

    There is nothing new about a high-profile or outspoken person being assassinated. It is one of the oldest tools in the book to get rid of someone who is either too powerful, too dangerous or too inconvenient. But most assassins choose a straight-forward method: Julius Caesar was stabbed to death, Abraham Lincoln was shot. It is now being speculated that the death of Kim Jong-nam - Kim Jong-un's oldest half-brother - may have been another one. If that proves true, its rumoured method - which supposedly saw two female assassins placing a poison-laced handkerchief over his mouth as he walked through the airport - puts his assassination among a select list of those killed by people who have chosen

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  • England's Big Picture: 13 - 19 February

    Each day we feature a photograph sent in from across England. At points throughout the year we may introduce a theme for the gallery - this week's theme is "love". Find out how you can submit your images and videos below. How to submit a picture If you have a picture you'd like to share, email us at england@bbc.co.uk, post it on Facebook or tweet it to @BBCEngland. You can also find us on Instagram - use #englandsbigpicture to share an image there. You can also see a recent archive of pictures on our England's Big Picture board on Pinterest. When emailing pictures, please make sure you include the following information: The full name of the person who took the pictures (as this person owns the

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  • Restaurant diners abandon meals after cockroaches found

    Diners were forced to abandon their meals at an Indian restaurant after health inspectors found an infestation of cockroaches. Sand's in Leicester was shut with immediate effect following a tip-off from a member of the public. Inspectors found live adult and immature German cockroaches and egg cases in the main food preparation area and in its stores on 4 February. The restaurant on Station Road has not responded to requests for a comment. Blaby District Council said environmental health officers found live and dead cockroaches in the kitchen which had a "large quantity of uncovered food". A number of dead cockroaches were also discovered in "extremely dirty" conditions. On the restaurant's TripAdvisor

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  • Senior Iranian military commander visits Moscow in violation of UN resolution

    Iranian Quds Force commander Qassem Soleimani traveled to Moscow, violating multiple United Nations resolutions forbidding him from leaving Iran, Fox News quoted US security sources saying. Soleimani is visiting Moscow to express his displeasure with the growing relations between Russia, Saudi Arabia and other Arab countries, in light of their weapons and economic deals, the report said.

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  • Google CEO Sundar Pichai writes back to girl, 7, who wants a job

    An "entrepreneurial" seven year old wrote to Google for a job and its CEO replied. After discussing her father's work, Chloe Bridgewater decided she would like to work for Google and penned a letter beginning "dear Google boss". It was only the schoolgirl's second letter, after her first missive to Father Christmas, but the search engine's CEO Sundar Pichai wrote back. Her father Andy said the girl "took it all in her stride". "We were gobsmacked, but I don't think Chloe could understand the magnitude of the reaction she'd got afterwards," said father Andy, a sales manager from Hereford. "She's got a great entrepreneurial spirit. Ever since nursery, she's always been told in school reports she's

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  • Cabbage attack The Sun after being tipped for success

    Manchester band Cabbage have attacked The Sun, after the newspaper tipped them for success in 2017. The five piece were among seven acts the paper championed as "the next big thing". But the boys dismissed the tag, calling the paper "odious" and "backward". In a tweet they told fans: "Don't buy The Sun. Don't even walk past it without burning it, or spitting on it. They try to tell you what to think." The band, who are also on the BBC's Sound of 2017 longlist, continued: "They pay no attention to what is real. "They exploit every single one of you and affect the way you think. "Everyone has a member of their family or a friend affected by this awful repeated propaganda. It's a crime." The lads

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  • The Engagement of 2 Children Aged 7 and 4 in Qaliubiyya Prompts Anger on Social Media

    Photos of an engagement ceremony held in Qaliubiya for a 7-year-old boy named Ziad and his 4-year-old cousin, Farida, went viral, sparking outrage on social media. Talking to Youm 7, Farida's father said that "everyone in the family was completely happy with the engagement." The father was also reported to have said that he had promised Ziad, who happens to be his nephew, that upon passing his second year of primary education, he can get engaged to Farida. EGP 18,000 worth of jewellery (shabka) was reportedly bought to Farida. According to a UNICEF 2016 report, 17% of Egyptians are already married before they turn 18.  Here's a sample of people's comments on the story: "I really can't understand

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  • Zayn Malik defends Gigi Hadid after 'racist' Snapchat video

    Zayn Malik has defended his girlfriend Gigi Hadid in a single tweet after her sister Bella posted a Snapchat video of her. In it, Gigi holds up a Buddha-shaped cookie, squints her eyes and smiles. Bella has since deleted it after fans called the model racist against Asians. But it's still been widely shared online. Critics were keen to highlight Zayn's Asian heritage, prompting him to defend her. After being questioned by fans about the video, Zayn replied to one saying: "Trust me.. she likes asians ;)". Gigi Hadid was named international model of the year at the 2016 Fashion Awards last December. But this isn't the first time she's been criticised. She had to apologise after co-hosting the American

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  • President Trump: Seven ways the world could change

    With Donald Trump in the White House, America's relationship with the rest of the world is on the verge of changing in some important ways. Here are seven of them. Nato faces a shake-up Mr Trump has been hugely critical of Nato (the North Atlantic Treaty Organization), a cornerstone of American foreign policy for more than 60 years. He has attacked the organisation as obsolete and characterised its members as ungrateful allies who benefit from US largesse. In one sense, Mr Trump's rhetoric simply gives voice to longstanding US concerns about most Nato members not meeting their goal of spending at least 2% of GDP on defence, while US defence spending is the largest in the world. More recently,

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  • Egyptian Airport Security Victoriously 'Flips the Bird' After Confiscating EGP 1.36m Hidden in Ducks

    Earlier Today, EGP 1.36 million has been found stuffed in raw ducks in the luggage of a man en route to Kuwait, according to Al Wafd. Port security manager General Hossam Nasr caught the man, who goes by the name of Tamer, in customs, smuggling the duck-filled money in Asyut airport. Tamer’s luggage had initially passed the first phase of airport screening without the ducks being detected. After discovering the money hidden within the ducks, the team behind the bust decided to pose for a photo with one guard 'flipping the bird' in celebration, which has since gone viral on social media.  According to Sadaa News, The smuggler is an Egyptian who originally resides in Abnub, Asyut. He has a bachelor

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  • ‘The Fast and the Furious’ to be re-released in cinemas to celebrate 15th anniversary

    "The Fast and the Furious", the first ever film in the franchise of the same name, is set to be re-released to mark the movie's 15th anniversary. Fans will be able to see the film on the big screen once again when it is released in around 1,500 cinemas on Wednesday June 22, the date when the original movie opened back in 2001. The original story follows a police officer in Los Angeles tasked with infiltrating and breaking up the street-racing scene, only to find himself hooked on the illegal sport. The film was a surprise hit at the time — partly due to a cast of mainly unknown actors and actresses — and has gone on to spawn six sequels to date. The original film featured male actors Paul Walker

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  • The world's most mysterious family tree

    Behind North Korea's ruling family is a tangled web of bizarre fates. It isn't just the puzzling, was-he-poisoned death of Kim Jong Un's older brother. Before that, there was the startling execution of his uncle. And, of course, the reason why Kim leapfrogged past his older brothers to become his country's Supreme Leader. Here's a look:

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  • Nicole Kidman: I wish I'd had more children, 10/01/2017, Victoria Derbyshire

    Nicole Kidman tells Victoria she was brought to tears by the “beautiful” depiction of an adoptive mother’s love in her latest film, Lion.The film – based on a true story – sees Kidman’s character Sue Brierley adopt a five-year-old boy, Saroo. The actress, who has two adopted children in real life, also told Victoria that she would like more children of her own, but that her husband Keith Urban has told her to "shut down" such thoughts.

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  • Russia seeks 'post-West' order as US vows loyalty to allies - International - World

    Russia Saturday called for an end to what it said was an outdated world order dominated by the West after US Vice President Mike Pence pledged Washington's "unwavering" commitment to transatlantic allies in NATO. Russian Foreign Minister Sergei Lavrov offered a diametrically opposed global vision, just hours after Pence vowed to stand with Europe to rein in a resurgent Moscow. "I hope that (the world) will choose a democratic world order -- a post-West one -- in which each country is defined by its sovereignty," said Lavrov. The time when the West called the shots was over while NATO was a relic of the Cold War, he said. In its place, Moscow wanted a relationship with Washington that is "pragmatic

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  • Plastic 'nurdles' found littering UK beaches

    A search of 279 beaches around the UK has found that almost three-quarters of them were littered with tiny plastic "nurdles". Volunteers signed up to search their local shoreline, ranging between Shetland and the Scilly Isles, for the lentil-sized pellets, used as a raw material to make plastic products. They can cause damage to such wildlife as birds and fish, which eat them. The findings will be reflected in a government study into microplastics. What's the problem? Campaigners estimate that up to 53 billion of the tiny pellets escape into the UK's environment each year. This happens during the manufacture, transport or use of plastic products. The nurdles are often spilt accidentally into

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  • Assynt's Gaelic influence on artist's surreal paintings

    A Scottish artist has drawn on his upbringing among some of the last native Gaelic speakers in Assynt for a series of new and surreal paintings. David Hutchison is based in Edinburgh, where his new exhibition of video and paintings - Seordag and The Deadgirls - opens next month. The artwork features an unusual mix of a robot hen, two haunting female figures and Suilven, a famous mountain in Assynt. Artist and film-maker Hutchison grew up in and around Inverkirkaig in Assynt, in north west Sutherland, an area of small communities set in spectacular landscape of hills, mountains and lochs. He says the place and the people living and working there made a big impression on his young life, and his

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  • Thai police raid Dhammakaya temple in hunt for wanted monk

    Thai police have begun searching a Buddhist temple complex in a bid to arrest an influential monk wanted over alleged money laundering. Officers entered the site after previous attempts were thwarted when thousands of the monk's devotees turned up in his defence. The spiritual leader is believed to be inside the large compound. Police said they did not find him on Thursday but would return on Friday to continue looking. A Thai police spokesman said officers covered 15-20% of the complex. The search warrant was valid for 10 days, he said. The Dhammakaya temple is a sprawling compound on the outskirts of Bangkok. Its founder, Phra Dhammajayo, is accused of embezzling funds from the temple, but

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  • Scarlett Moffatt to host Streetmate dating show reboot on Channel 4

    Scarlett Moffatt will host a reboot of Streetmate for Channel 4. Originally presented by Davina McCall back in the 1990s, the programme helps single people to find a date with someone they see on the streets. "I can't believe Channel 4 have asked me to present this iconic dating show," said Scarlett. Channel 4 have signed the 26-year-old to co-host an entertainment show alongside Alan Carr, although further details have yet to be revealed. "I remember watching Davina on Streetmate when I was younger and thinking females can present entertainment shows too, I want to do that when I'm older," said Scarlett. "It's such a fun show and it's two of my favourite things to do, chat to randomers and a

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  • Spotting the illness that can cause sudden blindness

    Every year in the UK, 3,000 people's sight is damaged by a condition called giant cell arteritis. The symptoms can appear very suddenly and end in irreversible blindness. Dr Saleyha Ahsan met a group of people who've been affected and explains what to look out for. "My mother in law lost a lot of weight, she was very low mood, very painful scalp, jaw pain - and when I say painful scalp, brushing her hair became impossible," says Amanda Bartlett. "Within the four hours that we were in eye casualty, towards the end she reached round her chair and grabbed my hand and said 'Amanda, I can't see anything.' And she lost her sight that afternoon." Another woman tells me she felt "jaw ache, neck ache,

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