• Egyptian Airport Security Victoriously 'Flips the Bird' After Confiscating EGP 1.36m Hidden in Ducks

    Earlier Today, EGP 1.36 million has been found stuffed in raw ducks in the luggage of a man en route to Kuwait, according to Al Wafd. Port security manager General Hossam Nasr caught the man, who goes by the name of Tamer, in customs, smuggling the duck-filled money in Asyut airport. Tamer’s luggage had initially passed the first phase of airport screening without the ducks being detected. After discovering the money hidden within the ducks, the team behind the bust decided to pose for a photo with one guard 'flipping the bird' in celebration, which has since gone viral on social media.  According to Sadaa News, The smuggler is an Egyptian who originally resides in Abnub, Asyut. He has a bachelor

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  • The world's most unusual assassinations

    There is nothing new about a high-profile or outspoken person being assassinated. It is one of the oldest tools in the book to get rid of someone who is either too powerful, too dangerous or too inconvenient. But most assassins choose a straight-forward method: Julius Caesar was stabbed to death, Abraham Lincoln was shot. It is now being speculated that the death of Kim Jong-nam - Kim Jong-un's oldest half-brother - may have been another one. If that proves true, its rumoured method - which supposedly saw two female assassins placing a poison-laced handkerchief over his mouth as he walked through the airport - puts his assassination among a select list of those killed by people who have chosen

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  • President Trump: Seven ways the world could change

    With Donald Trump in the White House, America's relationship with the rest of the world is on the verge of changing in some important ways. Here are seven of them. Nato faces a shake-up Mr Trump has been hugely critical of Nato (the North Atlantic Treaty Organization), a cornerstone of American foreign policy for more than 60 years. He has attacked the organisation as obsolete and characterised its members as ungrateful allies who benefit from US largesse. In one sense, Mr Trump's rhetoric simply gives voice to longstanding US concerns about most Nato members not meeting their goal of spending at least 2% of GDP on defence, while US defence spending is the largest in the world. More recently,

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  • The Engagement of 2 Children Aged 7 and 4 in Qaliubiyya Prompts Anger on Social Media

    Photos of an engagement ceremony held in Qaliubiya for a 7-year-old boy named Ziad and his 4-year-old cousin, Farida, went viral, sparking outrage on social media. Talking to Youm 7, Farida's father said that "everyone in the family was completely happy with the engagement." The father was also reported to have said that he had promised Ziad, who happens to be his nephew, that upon passing his second year of primary education, he can get engaged to Farida. EGP 18,000 worth of jewellery (shabka) was reportedly bought to Farida. According to a UNICEF 2016 report, 17% of Egyptians are already married before they turn 18.  Here's a sample of people's comments on the story: "I really can't understand

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  • Listen to Emma Watson sing as Belle in the new Beauty and the Beast film

    A preview of Emma Watson singing as Belle in the new Beauty and the Beast film has got fans going crazy. The video released on social media, has now been viewed over 12m times on Facebook alone. Since it was announced in 2015 that the actress would play Belle in the remake of the Disney classic, fans have had high expectations. And this short but sweet debut of her singing voice has left them wanting to hear more. Beauty and the Beast tells the improbable story of a young maiden who falls in love with a beast. Emma found global fame as Hermione in the Harry Potter films but her singing voice appears to have been a well-kept secret. "THIS IS GOLD. She has reproduced so many different singing styles

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  • England's Big Picture: 13 - 19 February

    Each day we feature a photograph sent in from across England. At points throughout the year we may introduce a theme for the gallery - this week's theme is "love". Find out how you can submit your images and videos below. How to submit a picture If you have a picture you'd like to share, email us at england@bbc.co.uk, post it on Facebook or tweet it to @BBCEngland. You can also find us on Instagram - use #englandsbigpicture to share an image there. You can also see a recent archive of pictures on our England's Big Picture board on Pinterest. When emailing pictures, please make sure you include the following information: The full name of the person who took the pictures (as this person owns the

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  • Cabbage attack The Sun after being tipped for success

    Manchester band Cabbage have attacked The Sun, after the newspaper tipped them for success in 2017. The five piece were among seven acts the paper championed as "the next big thing". But the boys dismissed the tag, calling the paper "odious" and "backward". In a tweet they told fans: "Don't buy The Sun. Don't even walk past it without burning it, or spitting on it. They try to tell you what to think." The band, who are also on the BBC's Sound of 2017 longlist, continued: "They pay no attention to what is real. "They exploit every single one of you and affect the way you think. "Everyone has a member of their family or a friend affected by this awful repeated propaganda. It's a crime." The lads

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  • Corruption Perceptions Index Names Egypt the 68th Most Corrupt Country in the World

    According to Transparency International’s Corruption Perceptions Index, Egypt ranks 108 out of 176 countries assessed for corruption in 2016, making it the 68th most corrupt country assessed. The Index uses a scale from 0 (highly corrupt) to 100 (very clean), with the global median sitting at 43 – below the midpoint. According to this scale, Egypt ranked 34 – well below the midpoint.  Somalia, South Sudan, and North Korea were the top three most corrupt countries that were assessed, scaled at 10, 11, and 12 respectively. The least corrupt countries assessed were New Zealand, Denmark, and Finland scaled at 90, 90, and 89 respectively. The assessment was reported based on a country’s ability to

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  • Children and Duterte's drug war: Lessons from the past

    Manila, Philippines - Jose flipped three coins into the air when two gunmen on a motorcycle opened fire. They shot the 15-year-old suspected drug user seven times. The boy hit the ground, along with the coins that he had tossed as part of a traditional Filipino game called hantak. He had been playing with his friends while selling cigarettes on a rundown street in Caloocan City. Jose, whose name has been changed for this story to ensure his safety, was taken to hospital. He survived, but is fearful of being targeted again. His attackers were never arrested. Now three months later - with vigilantes still on the prowl - he seldom goes out at night. Though his future remains uncertain, Jose acknowledges

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  • Zayn Malik defends Gigi Hadid after 'racist' Snapchat video

    Zayn Malik has defended his girlfriend Gigi Hadid in a single tweet after her sister Bella posted a Snapchat video of her. In it, Gigi holds up a Buddha-shaped cookie, squints her eyes and smiles. Bella has since deleted it after fans called the model racist against Asians. But it's still been widely shared online. Critics were keen to highlight Zayn's Asian heritage, prompting him to defend her. After being questioned by fans about the video, Zayn replied to one saying: "Trust me.. she likes asians ;)". Gigi Hadid was named international model of the year at the 2016 Fashion Awards last December. But this isn't the first time she's been criticised. She had to apologise after co-hosting the American

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  • Future of Palestine in the changing world order

    The mainstream American media were in full agreement: President Trump’s shift on the two-state solution, as evinced in his remarks last Wednesday during a white House press conference with Benjamin Netanyahu, has upended a long-held position by the US and by the international community. ‘Honest broker’ The vagueness of his remarks suggests that the businessman-turned-president has no inkling about diplomacy, least of all Mideast diplomacy, or about the complexities of the issues at hand in that part of the world Fawaz Turki The rabbit and fox proverb Last Update: Friday, 17 February 2017 KSA 10:37 - GMT 07:37 Disclaimer: Views expressed by writers in this section are their own and do not reflect

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  • Restaurant diners abandon meals after cockroaches found

    Diners were forced to abandon their meals at an Indian restaurant after health inspectors found an infestation of cockroaches. Sand's in Leicester was shut with immediate effect following a tip-off from a member of the public. Inspectors found live adult and immature German cockroaches and egg cases in the main food preparation area and in its stores on 4 February. The restaurant on Station Road has not responded to requests for a comment. Blaby District Council said environmental health officers found live and dead cockroaches in the kitchen which had a "large quantity of uncovered food". A number of dead cockroaches were also discovered in "extremely dirty" conditions. On the restaurant's TripAdvisor

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  • This Female Entrepreneur Just Created an App to Fight Sexual Harassment in the Arab World

    Zaineb is walking cheerily down the street in the Moroccan city of Efrane when she hears a whistle. Agitated, she pulls her hood over her head, alters her route, and army marches her way along with a poker face - but with no luck. He is still following her. His footsteps seem closer. Zaineb feels her heart pound faster as she fastens her pace and leaves the dimly-lit street. She finally reaches her destination, but she doesn’t feel safe. Across the Middle East and North Africa, thousands of women mirror Zaineb’s experience and have to walk the daunting path of everyday sexual harassment; according to research by UN Women, 93 percent of women across the MENA region have suffered it at least once

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  • Riyadh and Jeddah positioned as GCC ‘Global Cities of the Future’

    RIYADH — Riyadh ranks fourth, followed by Jeddah, in A. T. Kearney’s latest report titled ‘Global Cities of the Future, a GCC Perspective’, developed for the World Government Summit 2017. Riyadh is increasingly investing in becoming a regional hub for business and logistics whilst Jeddah is renowned for its influx of pilgrims, positioning the city as a key cultural center According to the global management consulting firm’s report, Riyadh is the largest of the GCC cities in terms of population and is the fourth most global city. Saudi Arabia’s Vision 2030 is to position the country as the heart of the Arab and Islamic world, an investment powerhouse, and the hub that connects three continents

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  • Indiana girls Liberty German and Abigail William found dead

    Two 13-year-old US girls who went missing on Monday have been found dead, and the case is being investigated as a double homicide, police say. The bodies, recovered on Tuesday near a creek in the US state of Indiana, were of Liberty German and Abigail Williams, post-mortem examinations confirmed. The girls were reported missing when they failed to show up to a meeting point after a hike. Police have yet to release a cause of death, citing an ongoing investigation. The girls' bodies were discovered along the edge of Deer Creek, about a mile east of Delphi, Indiana. They were found not far from an abandoned rail bridge where they had been dropped off to go hiking on Monday. The pair were reported

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  • Where was Sasha during Obama's farewell speech?

    Where was Sasha Obama? The goodbye photo clearly only shows 18-year-old Malia Obama on stage with mum and dad, Michelle and Barack, but there's no sign of her 15-year-old sister. ***Spoiler*** The simple explanation is that she stayed in Washington because she had an exam at Sidwell Friends private school on Wednesday morning. The school has educated the children of American presidents for years, including Chelsea Clinton. So it will be used to cracking down on pupils for trying to miss class because of official presidential engagements. But that didn't stop the #WhereIsSasha fun on social media. Some people hoped she was trying to stop Donald Trump getting into the White House Some tweeters

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  • The world's most mysterious family tree

    Behind North Korea's ruling family is a tangled web of bizarre fates. It isn't just the puzzling, was-he-poisoned death of Kim Jong Un's older brother. Before that, there was the startling execution of his uncle. And, of course, the reason why Kim leapfrogged past his older brothers to become his country's Supreme Leader. Here's a look:

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  • ‘The Fast and the Furious’ to be re-released in cinemas to celebrate 15th anniversary

    "The Fast and the Furious", the first ever film in the franchise of the same name, is set to be re-released to mark the movie's 15th anniversary. Fans will be able to see the film on the big screen once again when it is released in around 1,500 cinemas on Wednesday June 22, the date when the original movie opened back in 2001. The original story follows a police officer in Los Angeles tasked with infiltrating and breaking up the street-racing scene, only to find himself hooked on the illegal sport. The film was a surprise hit at the time — partly due to a cast of mainly unknown actors and actresses — and has gone on to spawn six sequels to date. The original film featured male actors Paul Walker

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  • Iranian president supports Amir's call for dialogue

    Rouhani visits Kuwait, Oman to improve ties KUWAIT: Iranian President Hassan Rouhani visited Kuwait yesterday as part of a lightning two-nation Gulf tour aimed at mending ties strained by the conflicts in Syria and Yemen. Rouhani held talks with HH the Amir Sheikh Sabah Al-Ahmad Al-Jaber Al-Sabah, who last month launched a dialogue with the Islamic republic to normalize Iran-Gulf relations. An official statement cited by the KUNA news agency said they discussed bolstering bilateral ties in all fields. They also held talks on “latest regional and international developments,” said the statement, without giving further details. Ahead of his visit to Oman and Kuwait, Rouhani had expressed support

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  • Five things you can do to improve your netball skills

    England's netballers are in the middle of playing the world's best teams in the Quad series. So far they've beaten South Africa in Durban but lost to New Zealand in Liverpool. On Sunday they take on the best team in the world - Australia - at Wembley Arena. As the Roses look towards their final game in the series, they've given Newsbeat some tips about what you can do to improve your game. 1. Keep on chatting "Communication is key," England captain Ama Agbeze tells Newsbeat. "So keep working with the players around you and talking to them. "It's a team game so communicating helps loads. "It means if your teammates cover one thing, you can set yourself up for getting interceptions." 2. Practice

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