• From the Golan, Iran is paving the way for a new war in Lebanon

    ‘Harkat al Nujaba’ or the ‘Movement of the Nobles’ is not temerarious enough to contend the Arabic language printed by the Iranians on placards carried by masked members to declare the formation of the Golan Liberation Brigade. The Golan name is misspelled missing the introducatory ‘al’ that precedes Golan as it should be written in the Arabic language. The militia’s official spokesperson, Hashim al Mussawi, said in a press conference on March 8 in Tehran that the new unit could assist the Syrian regime in taking the Golan Heights, a region occupied by Israel since 1967, a verdict he left entirely to Damascus to take, saying: “Should the Syrian government make the request, we are ready to participate in the liberation of occupied Golan with our allies.

    english.alarabiya.net q
  • North Korea: Who would dare to piggyback on Kim Jong-un?

    North Korea's test of a rocket engine last weekend was accompanied by the usual state media propaganda - but one image of its leader celebrating stood out in particular. What is the likely explanation? The engine test was claimed to be a success, a "new birth" for North Korea's rocket industry. Kim Jong-un was certainly happy. In pictures released by state news agency KCNA, he was seen watching the missile from afar; grinning in a control centre; shaking hands with jubilant officers - then, giving an elderly man a piggyback. Who would leap onto the back of a dictator such as this, and why? Observers say the mysterious man is not a known figure in North Korean politics. He is thought to have played

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  • Man found guilty of attempted rape at railway station

    A 24-year-old man has been found guilty of the attempted rape of a woman at a railway station in Suffolk. The 21-year-old victim was attacked as she waited for a train on a platform at Melton station near Woodbridge in July 2016. Sam Duncan, of Alan Road, Ipswich, had denied the charge. He was convicted after less than two hours of deliberations by jurors at Ipswich Crown Court. He is due to be sentenced in April. The court heard Duncan grabbed the woman and as she waited on a platform at 21:45 BST on 19 July 2016 and told her "you're going to get it tonight", but she managed to push him away. She then boarded the train to Ipswich and spoke with the guard who called police. During his trial,

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  • The daredevils feeding a dangerous Russian craze

    A number of young Russians are making names for themselves by posting videos of life-threatening stunts online. What drives these extreme selfie daredevils? He's got a camera strapped to his head and he teeters on the edge of the roof in a nine-storey apartment block in Siberia. "Are you filming?" he asks, as a friend hands him a flaming torch. Orange flames engulf his legs and suddenly he jumps, somersaulting in the air like a stricken warplane before landing with a thud into a deep pile of snow. Remarkably, he's unhurt - if a little winded. Police tell a gaggle of onlookers to stop filming, but within hours, footage of this potentially deadly jump goes viral - various videos of the stunt filmed

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  • India meat crackdown leaves butchers concerned

    Several slaughterhouses and meat shops have been shut in the northern Indian state of Uttar Pradesh after the Hindu nationalist Bharatiya Janata Party (BJP) comprehensively won state assembly elections in India's most populous state. The new chief minister, Yogi Adityanath, is a strong supporter of laws protecting cows, and has publicly opposed beef consumption. The slaughter of cows and consumption of beef is considered taboo by India's majority Hindu population - and is illegal in most Indian states including Uttar Pradesh. Reports say that immediately after taking office, one of his first acts was to instruct police officials to crack down on "illegal" slaughterhouses in the state. Locals

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  • The Engagement of 2 Children Aged 7 and 4 in Qaliubiyya Prompts Anger on Social Media

    Photos of an engagement ceremony held in Qaliubiya for a 7-year-old boy named Ziad and his 4-year-old cousin, Farida, went viral, sparking outrage on social media. Talking to Youm 7, Farida's father said that "everyone in the family was completely happy with the engagement." The father was also reported to have said that he had promised Ziad, who happens to be his nephew, that upon passing his second year of primary education, he can get engaged to Farida. EGP 18,000 worth of jewellery (shabka) was reportedly bought to Farida. According to a UNICEF 2016 report, 17% of Egyptians are already married before they turn 18.  Here's a sample of people's comments on the story: "I really can't understand

    cairoscene.com q
  • George Michael: Andrew Ridgeley attacks 'mucky' Channel 5 documentary

    Channel 5 has defended broadcasting a documentary about George Michael after the singer's former bandmate dubbed it "sensationalist and mucky". Andrew Ridgeley took to social media on Thursday to criticise the show, titled The Last Days of George Michael. The former Wham! star said the channel had been "insensitive, contemptuous and reprehensible" and should have waited until after his friend's funeral. But Channel 5 said it was "a measured account" of Michael's life and death. "George Michael was a high-profile public figure and there has been legitimate public interest in the circumstances surrounding his death," the broadcaster said in a statement. It said the documentary, which aired at 21:00

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  • Mattek-Sands upsets Svitolina

    KEY BISCAYNE — Bethanie Mattek-Sands picked up her first top-10 victory since 2015, upsetting ninth-seeded Elina Svitolina 7-5, 6-4 Thursday to reach the Miami Open’s third round. Mattek-Sands, who turned 32 Thursday, is ranked only 158th in singles and needed a wild-card invitation to get into the hard-court tournament. She is ranked No. 1 in doubles. Against Svitolina, Mattek-Sands saved 12 of the 15 break points she faced. The woman with whom Mattek-Sands won the doubles championships at the past two Grand Slam tournaments, Lucie Safarova, eliminated 23rd-seeded Daria Gavrilova 6-2, 6-2 Thursday. Safarova, the 2015 French Open runner-up, is ranked 36th, so was just outside the seedings at

    Saudi Gazette q
  • South China Sea installations ‘primarily’ civilian: Li

    SYDNEY: China is not militarising the disputed South China Sea, the country’s premier said Friday in Australia, claiming defense equipment Beijing has installed on artificial islands is “primarily” for civilian use. The sea is a source of growing regional tension, with Beijing insisting it has sovereignty over virtually all the resource-rich waters, which are also claimed in part by several other countries, and deemed international waters by most of the world. “Even if there is a certain amount of defense equipment or facilities, it is for maintaining the freedom of navigation,” Premier Li Keqiang told a press conference with Australia Prime Minister Malcolm Turnbull in Canberra. “Because without

    Arab News q
  • Why Apple's red iPhones are not 'Red' in China

    Apple's latest iPhone might be red, but it's not Red in China. The special-edition version of the iPhone 7 and 7plus goes on sale in more than 40 countries, but China has done it slightly differently. The BBC explains why. What is Red about? Red is a charity looking to combat Aids and was originally founded by U2 musician Bono and activist Bobby Shriver. It gives the money it raises to the Global Fund for HIV/Aids that doles out grants. This includes providing testing and treatment for patients with the aim of wiping out transmission of HIV. Apple is the world's largest corporate donor to the Global Fund. The special-edition devices celebrate Apple's long-running partnership with Red and a portion

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  • Week in pictures: 18-24 March

    Our selection of some of the most striking news photographs taken around the world this week. All photographs are copyrighted.

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  • London attack: The victims

    The stories of Khalid Masood's victims have revealed the diversity of London and its visitors. Four people were killed and 50 injured when Masood drove his car into people on Westminster Bridge and stabbed an officer guarding Parliament. On Thursday, Theresa May said the victims came from 11 countries, including Romania, the US, and China. 'Lovely man' Police named the 75-year-old man who died on Thursday night - becoming the fourth victim of attacker Khalid Masood - as Leslie Rhodes, from south London. Police said his life support had been withdrawn. Mr Rhodes, a retired window cleaner, is thought to have been visiting a nearby hospital when he was hit by the car driven by Masood. Neighbours

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  • Emotional moments

    FATHER is the first hero of every son. The bond between the two is timeless. A father shapes his son’s life and when the son steps into his dad’s shoes, life comes full circle. It is a beautiful journey marked with emotions, sacrifices, tears and joy, and above all a bond of love that goes beyond all descriptions. It was this bond that brought 32-year-old Ameen Khan from India to Saudi Arabia to get his jailed father Banna Khan released. Khan was imprisoned in the Kingdom for causing the death of a colleague during a quarrel over a work visa. The visa was meant for Ameen, who could not utilize it due to the tragic twist of events. Banna Khan, a native of Ajmer in India, worked as a shepherd in

    Saudi Gazette q
  • Saudi soldier killed by Houthi shelling in south Dhahran

    Saudi Interior Ministry reported on Thursday that a soldier has been killed by Houthi shelling on a border post in south Dhahran. Earlier, a toddler was killed when a projectile launched by the militia from Yemen territories hit a residential area in Najran, southwestern Saudi Arabia.

    News q
  • Mubarak: A quiet release for a military strongman

    In 2011, millions of Egyptians took to the streets demanding the removal of their autocratic president of 30 years, Hosni Mubarak. But six years after he stepped down, the public response to news that he has now been freed from detention has been remarkably quiet. Earlier this month, a top appeals court cleared Mubarak of involvement in killing some of the 900 protesters who died during the country's uprising. Egypt's prosecutor ruled there was no reason to hold him, as he had already served a three-year sentence for embezzling public funds. After the first legal decision, the ex-president gave a rare telephone interview to an Egyptian journalist, who offered her congratulations. He told her

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  • Muhammad Ali Jinnah: Father of the Nation

    Muhammad Ali Jinnah was born in Karachi on Dec. 25, 1876. After receiving secondary school education in Karachi, he went to England for higher studies. He joined Lincoln’s Inn to study Law. Upon returning home after completing his studies, he started his career as a young barrister in Bombay. He soon joined politics and started political struggle for independence. Jinnah helped in the 1916 Lucknow Pact between the Indian National Congress and the All-India Muslim League, the two political parties of the time. He became a key leader in the All India Home Rule League and proposed a 14-point constitutional reform plan to safeguard the political rights of Muslims. He left Congress and joined All-India

    Saudi Gazette q
  • This Female Entrepreneur Just Created an App to Fight Sexual Harassment in the Arab World

    Zaineb is walking cheerily down the street in the Moroccan city of Efrane when she hears a whistle. Agitated, she pulls her hood over her head, alters her route, and army marches her way along with a poker face - but with no luck. He is still following her. His footsteps seem closer. Zaineb feels her heart pound faster as she fastens her pace and leaves the dimly-lit street. She finally reaches her destination, but she doesn’t feel safe. Across the Middle East and North Africa, thousands of women mirror Zaineb’s experience and have to walk the daunting path of everyday sexual harassment; according to research by UN Women, 93 percent of women across the MENA region have suffered it at least once

    Cairo Scene q
  • New Biopic About Egyptian-Born Superstar Dalida Set to Premiere This Month

    The French production was released in France today, opening to critical acclaim.Dalida rose to fame after she won the Miss Egypt pageant in 1954 when she was spotted by the French director Marc de Gastyne, who persuaded her to move to Paris to pursue a career in motion pictures. The move was a kick-start to Dalida's three decade long career, in which she performed and recorded countless international hits in more than 10 languages, including Arabic, French, English, and Italian, selling more than 130 million copies worldwide, before her tragic death in 1987. In a press statement by Bernard Regnauld-Fabre, the French Ambassador to Bahrain, he said, “We welcome the news that the world premiere of Dalida will take place here in Bahrain during So French Week.” So French Week is an annual week-long celebration of French culture, held by the French Embassy in Bahrain, a tradition which started in 2013.

    cairoscene.com q
  • Freerunning community left 'scarred' after Nye Newman's death in Paris

    The UK's freerunning community has been left "scarred" after the death of Nye Newman. The 17-year-old's parkour group, Brewman, says he died on New Year's Day in an accident on the Paris Metro. The group has denied he was train surfing at the time. Speaking to Newsbeat, his friend Jacob Kohn described Nye Newman as "such a great person, an independent person - he was always doing stuff for everyone else". "It's going to leave a big scar on the freerunning community. "I don't think anyone's going to get over it anytime soon. It's going to be tough." Brewman posted a video of Nye freerunning in Paris days before he died. Jacob says he knew Nye when they first started freerunning together, but says

    BBC Radio 1 Newsbeat q
  • London attack: 'Final' photo of murdered PC Keith Palmer emerges

    A "final" picture of PC Keith Palmer taken shortly before he was killed in the Westminster attack has emerged. The photo was taken by US tourist Staci Martin as she posed with the officer 45 minutes before he was stabbed by Khalid Masood outside Parliament. Others who also met the police officer during visits to the capital have been paying tribute, calling him a "genuinely nice bloke". A JustGiving page set up for the family of PC Palmer has raised over £600,000. The Metropolitan Police said that as a mark of respect, the constable's shoulder number, 4157U, would be retired and not reissued to any other officer. Ms Martin was on a visit from Florida to London when she asked to take a picture

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