• Trump's anti-Iran aggression couldn't come at a worse time

    (CNN)At first glance, it appears that there are only two clear paths that the US can take when dealing with the Middle East: the Sunni path of Saudi Arabia and the bulk of its Gulf allies, on the one hand; or the Shiite path represented by Iran. There is the path of dictators -- like Egypt's autocratic Abdel Fattah el-Sisi, the blinkered and aging royal family of Saudi Arabia, and the corrupt and helpless rulers of Iraq -- all Sunnis. By contrast, there is the young and desperately eager majority of Iranians, all Shiites, seeking to drag their nation out from under the yoke of a medieval clerical oppression. The Trump administration, seduced by an effusive Saudi welcome -- in sharp contrast to anything provided his predecessor, Barack Obama -- may be taking the wrong road.

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  • Pippa Middleton weds millionaire financier James Matthews

    (CNN)Royalty and celebrities gathered Saturday to watch as Philippa Charlotte "Pippa" Middleton, the younger sister of Catherine, the Duchess of Cambridge, married millionaire hedge fund manager, James Matthews, in Englefield, England. Middleton arrived with her father in an open-top vintage car shortly before rain started to fall, UK's Press Association reported. Once at the picturesque St. Mark's Church, father and daughter enjoyed a quiet moment before walking in. The rain stayed away for most of the morning as guests streamed into the 12th-century church. The ceremony took place just a few miles from the Middleton estate, where the marquee reception will be held. Classic cars also brought

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  • The countries that cane their convicts

    Two men are due to be caned in public after they were caught in bed together in Aceh, Indonesia. The men will each receive 85 lashes in public, as punishment under the strict Islamic laws used in Aceh. It is the only Indonesian province where Sharia is in force. According to human rights campaign group Amnesty International, 108 people were punished for various offences in 2015. Their offences ranged from gambling to alcohol, adultery and public displays of intimacy outside of marriage. Pictures of these public punishments - designed to humiliate as much as to injure - show people being led onto a raised platform, and made to kneel or stand as a hooded man beats them with a long, thin cane while

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  • Philippines travel: The hanging coffins of Sagada

    To explore the ancient burial rites of the Igorot tribe head to Sagada, in the north of the Philippines.

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  • Saudi forces shoot down Houthi ballistic missile

    JEDDAH: Saudi Air Defense Forces shot down a ballistic missile fired by Houthi militias from Yemen toward Saudi Arabia Friday night, Arab Coalition command said. In a statement carried by the Saudi Press Agency (SPA), the coalition said the missile was intercepted and destroyed above an unpopulated area in a place called Al-Rin at about 8:45 p.m. “Coalition Air Forces retaliated immediately, hitting the sites of the missile's launching pads,” said the SPA report. Reuters earlier quoted a Yemeni news agency as saying the Iran-backed Houthis had fired a Burkan-1 missile toward Riyadh, just ahead of US President Donald Trump’s visit to Saudi Arabia. The Arab Coalition statement did not say if it

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  • Zakir Naik: Why India wants to arrest the preacher

    He has 16 million followers on Facebook, 150,000 on Twitter and has given more than 4,000 lectures on Islam across the world. But Zakir Abdul Karim Naik, the popular televangelist and Islamic preacher, is now wanted by the Indian authorities. Problems arose for the preacher last summer, after Bangladeshi authorities said that one of the gunmen responsible for an attack on a cafe in the Bangladeshi capital, Dhaka, which left 22 people dead, had been inspired by him. Bangladesh responded by banning Peace TV, an Islamic channel broadcast from Dubai which Naik founded in 2006 and which claims to reach 100 million people worldwide. The 51-year-old denied supporting violence, releasing a video statement

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  • Here's what we know about Donald Trump's daughter Tiffany

    Donald Trump is no stranger to the limelight - and neither are his family. Daughter Ivanka is known for her many business ventures, including clothing ranges and books. And his eldest sons, Eric and Donald Jr. are businessmen, following in their father's footsteps. However, as the president's youngest daughter, Tiffany, looks to move to Washington DC this autumn for law school, we take a look at the life of the lesser-known Trump. She is the only daughter of President Trump and his second wife, actress Marla Maples, to whom he was married for six years. Tiffany grew up in California and went to school in Calabasas and boasts over one million followers on social media. This following has led to

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  • Iranians in Kuwait vote in presidential election

    KUWAIT: The Iranian expatriates in Kuwait enthusiastically participated in the election yesterday to deliver their verdict on President Hassan Rouhani at the Iranian embassy and at the cultural attaché in Kuwait. According to the Iranian Ambassador to Kuwait Dr Ali Reza Enayati, the turnout was quite high and the voters started arriving at the embassy even before the polling booths opened at 8 am. “The voting was still going on even at 7 pm as the voters continued to show up even late in the evening,” he told Kuwait Times yesterday. According to the embassy estimates, around 40 percent of the Iranian citizens in the country cast their votes in the crucial election. Polling was extended in Iran

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  • Canada's Justin Trudeau photobombs students' prom picture

    Canada's Prime Minister Justin Trudeau made an unscheduled appearance in Vancouver on Friday night - jogging through a high school prom photo. The keen sportsman had been out for a run along the Stanley Park Seawall when he passed a group of students in full formalwear. His official photographer Adam Scotti tweeted a picture of the moment, captioned: "Prom season in #Vancouver". At first glance, it appears the PM has pulled off a sly photobomb. But one delighted student told Canada's CBC the group had spied him in shorts and t-shirt, and begged him to join their photo-shoot. "We were just taking photos and hanging around talking, and then Trudeau, he just comes running," Constantine Maragos said.

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  • Little Mix win best global act at Kids' Choice Awards

    Little Mix gave a shout out to their fans after their win at the Kids' Choice Awards (KCA). The British girl group won the favourite global music star award in Los Angeles. They performed their hit single Shout Out To My Ex and a version of their song Touch during the ceremony. Collecting their award, Perrie Edwards said: "You're the best fans in the world. We love you more than anything." Other winners of the night included Fifth Harmony, who picked up an award for favourite music group and Shawn Mendes, who won favourite male singer. Selena Gomez took home the award for favourite female singer. The Nickelodeon Kids' Choice awards are famous for soaking celebrities in green slime - and this

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  • Iran accuses US of 'Iranophobia'

    (CNN)Iran called on Washington on Monday to abandon its "warmongering policy, intervention, Iranophobia and sales of dangerous and useless weapons to the main sponsors of terrorism," according to state-run Press TV. Iranian Foreign Ministry spokesman Bahram Qassemi also claimed that US policy in the Middle East was destabilizing the region. Qassemi's comments come after US President Donald Trump clinched a massive $110 billion military deal with Saudi Arabia over the weekend during his first foreign trip since he took office. "From Lebanon to Iraq to Yemen, Iran funds, arms, and trains terrorists, militias, and other extremist groups that spread destruction and chaos across the region," Trump said.

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  • Pepsi and Nivea: Whose fault is it when ad campaigns go wrong?

    Marketing teams at some of the world's biggest brands haven't had the best of weeks. Pepsi faced criticism after being accused of appropriating Black Lives Matter with its Kendall Jenner ad. Nivea was also in trouble after using the slogan "white is purity" to advertise deodorant in the Middle East. We asked Lillian Sor, an executive at UK advertising agency Grey London, to explain how big marketing campaigns like these get made. Her clients include some of the country's biggest food and drink brands, along with high street shops. "We get commissioned to work by marketing directors at big brands," she explains. "They come to us with a business problem and we find a creative way to solve it."

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  • King arrives in Riyadh

    Custodian of the Two Holy Mosques King Salman is being received upon his arrival at King Salman Airbase in Riyadh, Friday. Riyadh Emir Prince Faisal Bin Bandar, several other princes, and high ranking officials were present at the airport to receive the King. — SPA

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  • Child injured after falling off cliff at Castlerock

    A 12-year-old boy has sustained head and leg injuries after falling up to 20ft (6m) off a cliff along Northern Ireland's north coast. It happened at Castlerock in County Londonderry at about 18:10 BST on Sunday. Paramedics were called to the scene before Coastguard rescue teams from Coleraine and Ballycastle were able to lift the boy to safety from the rocks. The boy was treated at the Causeway Hospital before being discharged. John McPoland of the Ambulance Service said: "We received reports that a 12-year-old male had fallen on to the rocks at the beach. We dispatched a rapid response paramedic and an accident and emergency crew. "When they arrived and assessed the scene, we required the assistance

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  • The tiny pill which gave birth to an economic revolution

    The contraceptive pill had profound social consequences. Everyone agrees with that. In fact, that was the point. Margaret Sanger, the birth control activist who urged scientists to develop it, wanted to liberate women sexually and socially, to put them on a more equal footing with men. But the pill wasn't just socially revolutionary. It also sparked an economic revolution - perhaps the most significant economic change of the late 20th Century. 50 Things That Made the Modern Economy highlights the inventions, ideas and innovations which have helped create the economic world in which we live. It is broadcast on the BBC World Service. You can find more information about the programme's sources and

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  • Duterte: China's Xi threatened 'war' over sea oil

    Philippine President Rodrigo Duterte said Chinese counterpart China Xi Jinping warned him there would be war if Manila tried to enforce an arbitration ruling and drill for oil in a disputed part of the South China Sea. In remarks that could infuriate China, Duterte hit back on Friday at domestic critics who said he has gone soft on Beijing by refusing to push it to comply with an award last year by the Permanent Court of Arbitration in The Hague, which ruled largely in favour of the Philippines. Duterte said he discussed it with Xi when the two met in Beijing on Monday, and got a firm but friendly warning. "We intend to drill oil there, if it's yours, well, that's your view, but my view is, I

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  • Zayn Malik defends Gigi Hadid after 'racist' Snapchat video

    Zayn Malik has defended his girlfriend Gigi Hadid in a single tweet after her sister Bella posted a Snapchat video of her. In it, Gigi holds up a Buddha-shaped cookie, squints her eyes and smiles. Bella has since deleted it after fans called the model racist against Asians. But it's still been widely shared online. Critics were keen to highlight Zayn's Asian heritage, prompting him to defend her. After being questioned by fans about the video, Zayn replied to one saying: "Trust me.. she likes asians ;)". Gigi Hadid was named international model of the year at the 2016 Fashion Awards last December. But this isn't the first time she's been criticised. She had to apologise after co-hosting the American

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  • The countries where people still eat cats and dogs for dinner

    The new Animal Protection Act will see anyone selling, eating or buying the animals for consumption facing fines of up to £6,500. Those found guilty of animal cruelty could also receive a huge fine of £52,000 and two years in prison. Taiwan is the first Asian country to crack down on the practice. The new law tackles long-standing cultural beliefs about the benefits of eating dogs - for example, eating black dogs in winter is supposed to help you stay warm. It was pushed through by President Tsai Ing-wen, who adopted three retired guide dogs last year and also has two cats, named Cookie and A-Tsai. So what about the rest of the continent? The practice of eating cats and dogs has become less common

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  • Mount Everest's famous Hillary Step destroyed, mountaineers confirm

    A famous feature of Mount Everest has collapsed, potentially making the world's highest peak even more dangerous to climbers. Mountaineers said the Hillary Step may have fallen victim to Nepal's devastating 2015 earthquake. The near-vertical 12m (39ft) rocky outcrop stood on the mountain's southeast ridge, and was the last great challenge before the top. It was named after Sir Edmund Hillary, who was the first to scale it in 1953. British mountaineer Tim Mosedale confirmed the news of the Step's demise on Facebook after reaching the summit on 16 May. Speaking to the BBC, he said the loss of the Step was "the end of an era". "It is associated with the history of Everest, and it is a great shame

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  • German schools get tough Prince Harry English exam changed

    German officials are changing a school English exam which many students and teachers deemed too difficult - partly because it included a poor recording of Prince Harry "mumbling" in a speech. The decision in the most populous state - North Rhine-Westphalia - came after an online student petition collected more than 43,000 signatures. Students also complained about a question on Apartheid in South Africa, which had difficult vocabulary. For many it was a very important exam. It was part of the state's middle-school leaving exams, taken by 16-year-olds, and counted for half of all the marks in English. The marks obtained in those exams usually determine what sort of apprenticeship students can

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