• Leggings and yoga pants: When tight trousers get controversial

    A social media storm erupted on Sunday when two girls were stopped from boarding a United Airlines flights because they were wearing leggings. The girls were flying as guests of employees, and thus were subject to the company's dress code. But it is not the first time leggings, also known as yoga pants, have caused controversy in the United States. The tight-fitting trousers, which have become increasingly popular leisure wear, have become the topic of hot debate in recent years. For many, they are simply a comfy alternative to jeans. For others, their form-hugging material makes them overly revealing or even obscene. Last October, a man in the US state of Rhode Island sent a letter to his local

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  • From the Golan, Iran is paving the way for a new war in Lebanon

    ‘Harkat al Nujaba’ or the ‘Movement of the Nobles’ is not temerarious enough to contend the Arabic language printed by the Iranians on placards carried by masked members to declare the formation of the Golan Liberation Brigade. The Golan name is misspelled missing the introducatory ‘al’ that precedes Golan as it should be written in the Arabic language. The militia’s official spokesperson, Hashim al Mussawi, said in a press conference on March 8 in Tehran that the new unit could assist the Syrian regime in taking the Golan Heights, a region occupied by Israel since 1967, a verdict he left entirely to Damascus to take, saying: “Should the Syrian government make the request, we are ready to participate in the liberation of occupied Golan with our allies.

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  • The daredevils feeding a dangerous Russian craze

    A number of young Russians are making names for themselves by posting videos of life-threatening stunts online. What drives these extreme selfie daredevils? He's got a camera strapped to his head and he teeters on the edge of the roof in a nine-storey apartment block in Siberia. "Are you filming?" he asks, as a friend hands him a flaming torch. Orange flames engulf his legs and suddenly he jumps, somersaulting in the air like a stricken warplane before landing with a thud into a deep pile of snow. Remarkably, he's unhurt - if a little winded. Police tell a gaggle of onlookers to stop filming, but within hours, footage of this potentially deadly jump goes viral - various videos of the stunt filmed

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  • Young Saudi nurses struggle with expectations versus reality of the job

    JEDDAH: Young Saudi nurses have difficulties reconciling their expectations working in a hospital with the reality of long hours, intense work and social and family pressures. Two Saudi nurses presented a study they conducted on intern nurses and the difficulties they face during their internship, which sometimes lead young women to leave the nursing profession. Noof Janbi and Lama Alsini are Saudi nurses-to-be currently completing their internship at King Faisal Specialist Hospital and Research Center (KFSHRC) in Jeddah. Janbi is studying at King Saud bin Abdulaziz University for Health Science, and Alsini studies at Jeddah’s King Abdulaziz University. Both are members of the Saudi Nursing Pioneers

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  • North Korea: Who would dare to piggyback on Kim Jong-un?

    North Korea's test of a rocket engine last weekend was accompanied by the usual state media propaganda - but one image of its leader celebrating stood out in particular. What is the likely explanation? The engine test was claimed to be a success, a "new birth" for North Korea's rocket industry. Kim Jong-un was certainly happy. In pictures released by state news agency KCNA, he was seen watching the missile from afar; grinning in a control centre; shaking hands with jubilant officers - then, giving an elderly man a piggyback. Who would leap onto the back of a dictator such as this, and why? Observers say the mysterious man is not a known figure in North Korean politics. He is thought to have played

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  • Man found guilty of attempted rape at railway station

    A 24-year-old man has been found guilty of the attempted rape of a woman at a railway station in Suffolk. The 21-year-old victim was attacked as she waited for a train on a platform at Melton station near Woodbridge in July 2016. Sam Duncan, of Alan Road, Ipswich, had denied the charge. He was convicted after less than two hours of deliberations by jurors at Ipswich Crown Court. He is due to be sentenced in April. The court heard Duncan grabbed the woman and as she waited on a platform at 21:45 BST on 19 July 2016 and told her "you're going to get it tonight", but she managed to push him away. She then boarded the train to Ipswich and spoke with the guard who called police. During his trial,

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  • Brazil meat scandal: China and others lift ban

    China has lifted a ban on imports of Brazilian meat imposed over allegations that companies have been selling unsafe produce for years. Brazil's Agriculture Minister Blairo Maggi says the move follows a "giant effort" by officials to explain the investigation into tainted food. Chile and Egypt have also lifted their bans, the Brazilian government says. Brazil is the world's biggest red meat and poultry exporter, selling more than $12bn (£9.7bn) a year. The scandal was triggered by a huge federal police operation last week that found evidence that meat-packers had been selling rotten and substandard produce for several years. China and Chile will keep their import bans for the 21 Brazilian units

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  • How a jacket and a briefcase shaped a partition love story

    These are two unremarkable, ordinary items: a traditional embroidered jacket and a drab, brown leather briefcase. They belonged to a man and a woman who lived in Punjab in undivided colonial India. They had been introduced to each other by their parents and were to be engaged when violence broke out in 1947. The troubled subcontinent was lurching towards a bloody partition as it split into the new independent nations of India and Pakistan. Communal violence erupted, leaving more than a million people dead and displacing tens of millions. Punjab was divided - western, mostly Muslim, parts went to Pakistan and eastern, mainly Hindu and Sikh parts, went to India. The newly-engaged man and woman

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  • London attack: The victims

    The stories of Khalid Masood's victims have revealed the diversity of London and its visitors. Four people were killed and 50 injured when Masood drove his car into people on Westminster Bridge and stabbed an officer guarding Parliament. On Thursday, Theresa May said the victims came from 11 countries, including Romania, the US, and China. 'Lovely man' Police named the 75-year-old man who died on Thursday night - becoming the fourth victim of attacker Khalid Masood - as Leslie Rhodes, from south London. Police said his life support had been withdrawn. Mr Rhodes, a retired window cleaner, is thought to have been visiting a nearby hospital when he was hit by the car driven by Masood. Neighbours

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  • India meat crackdown leaves butchers concerned

    Several slaughterhouses and meat shops have been shut in the northern Indian state of Uttar Pradesh after the Hindu nationalist Bharatiya Janata Party (BJP) comprehensively won state assembly elections in India's most populous state. The new chief minister, Yogi Adityanath, is a strong supporter of laws protecting cows, and has publicly opposed beef consumption. The slaughter of cows and consumption of beef is considered taboo by India's majority Hindu population - and is illegal in most Indian states including Uttar Pradesh. Reports say that immediately after taking office, one of his first acts was to instruct police officials to crack down on "illegal" slaughterhouses in the state. Locals

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  • The Engagement of 2 Children Aged 7 and 4 in Qaliubiyya Prompts Anger on Social Media

    Photos of an engagement ceremony held in Qaliubiya for a 7-year-old boy named Ziad and his 4-year-old cousin, Farida, went viral, sparking outrage on social media. Talking to Youm 7, Farida's father said that "everyone in the family was completely happy with the engagement." The father was also reported to have said that he had promised Ziad, who happens to be his nephew, that upon passing his second year of primary education, he can get engaged to Farida. EGP 18,000 worth of jewellery (shabka) was reportedly bought to Farida. According to a UNICEF 2016 report, 17% of Egyptians are already married before they turn 18.  Here's a sample of people's comments on the story: "I really can't understand

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  • Donald Trump Jr criticises London mayor after terror attack

    President Donald Trump's son has come under fire for criticising London's mayor, shortly after a terror attack on the UK capital killed three people. Donald Trump Jr tweeted an article written last year, in which Sadiq Khan said terror vigilance had become "part and parcel" of life in a global city. Mr Trump quoted the headline and tweeted: "You have to be kidding me?!" He angered many Britons who accused him of exploiting the tragedy and implying the quotes were made after the attack. Dozens were hurt in Wednesday's attack, when an assailant drove a car through pedestrians on Westminster Bridge and then fatally knifed a police officer who tried to stop him entering the Houses of Parliament.

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  • Muhammad Ali Jinnah: Father of the Nation

    Muhammad Ali Jinnah was born in Karachi on Dec. 25, 1876. After receiving secondary school education in Karachi, he went to England for higher studies. He joined Lincoln’s Inn to study Law. Upon returning home after completing his studies, he started his career as a young barrister in Bombay. He soon joined politics and started political struggle for independence. Jinnah helped in the 1916 Lucknow Pact between the Indian National Congress and the All-India Muslim League, the two political parties of the time. He became a key leader in the All India Home Rule League and proposed a 14-point constitutional reform plan to safeguard the political rights of Muslims. He left Congress and joined All-India

    Saudi Gazette q
  • Lyon bites back for Australia

    DHARAMSALA, India — Australia off-spinner Nathan Lyon claimed four wickets in the final session to halt India’s progress and help restrict the hosts to 248 for six on the second day of the fourth and final Test Sunday. At 157 for two, and with the dependable Cheteshwar Pujara and stand-in skipper Ajinkya Rahane looking set in the middle, India appeared to have the upper hand before Lyon (4-67) intervened after tea. In the first over of the final session, Lyon sent back Pujara for 57 and went on to dismiss Karun Nair, Rahane and Ravichandran Ashwin to deflate the hosts. Ravindra Jadeja clobbered a couple of sixes and was batting on 16 at the close, while Wriddhiman Saha was on 10, having survived

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  • ‘The Fast and the Furious’ to be re-released in cinemas to celebrate 15th anniversary

    "The Fast and the Furious", the first ever film in the franchise of the same name, is set to be re-released to mark the movie's 15th anniversary. Fans will be able to see the film on the big screen once again when it is released in around 1,500 cinemas on Wednesday June 22, the date when the original movie opened back in 2001. The original story follows a police officer in Los Angeles tasked with infiltrating and breaking up the street-racing scene, only to find himself hooked on the illegal sport. The film was a surprise hit at the time — partly due to a cast of mainly unknown actors and actresses — and has gone on to spawn six sequels to date. The original film featured male actors Paul Walker

    Egypt Independent: Cinema/TV q
  • London attack: 'Final' photo of murdered PC Keith Palmer emerges

    A "final" picture of PC Keith Palmer taken shortly before he was killed in the Westminster attack has emerged. The photo was taken by US tourist Staci Martin as she posed with the officer 45 minutes before he was stabbed by Khalid Masood outside Parliament. Others who also met the police officer during visits to the capital have been paying tribute, calling him a "genuinely nice bloke". A JustGiving page set up for the family of PC Palmer has raised over £600,000. The Metropolitan Police said that as a mark of respect, the constable's shoulder number, 4157U, would be retired and not reissued to any other officer. Ms Martin was on a visit from Florida to London when she asked to take a picture

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  • Why Apple's red iPhones are not 'Red' in China

    Apple's latest iPhone might be red, but it's not Red in China. The special-edition version of the iPhone 7 and 7plus goes on sale in more than 40 countries, but China has done it slightly differently. The BBC explains why. What is Red about? Red is a charity looking to combat Aids and was originally founded by U2 musician Bono and activist Bobby Shriver. It gives the money it raises to the Global Fund for HIV/Aids that doles out grants. This includes providing testing and treatment for patients with the aim of wiping out transmission of HIV. Apple is the world's largest corporate donor to the Global Fund. The special-edition devices celebrate Apple's long-running partnership with Red and a portion

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  • Week in pictures: 18-24 March

    Our selection of some of the most striking news photographs taken around the world this week. All photographs are copyrighted.

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  • Zayn Malik defends Gigi Hadid after 'racist' Snapchat video

    Zayn Malik has defended his girlfriend Gigi Hadid in a single tweet after her sister Bella posted a Snapchat video of her. In it, Gigi holds up a Buddha-shaped cookie, squints her eyes and smiles. Bella has since deleted it after fans called the model racist against Asians. But it's still been widely shared online. Critics were keen to highlight Zayn's Asian heritage, prompting him to defend her. After being questioned by fans about the video, Zayn replied to one saying: "Trust me.. she likes asians ;)". Gigi Hadid was named international model of the year at the 2016 Fashion Awards last December. But this isn't the first time she's been criticised. She had to apologise after co-hosting the American

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  • New Biopic About Egyptian-Born Superstar Dalida Set to Premiere This Month

    The French production was released in France today, opening to critical acclaim.Dalida rose to fame after she won the Miss Egypt pageant in 1954 when she was spotted by the French director Marc de Gastyne, who persuaded her to move to Paris to pursue a career in motion pictures. The move was a kick-start to Dalida's three decade long career, in which she performed and recorded countless international hits in more than 10 languages, including Arabic, French, English, and Italian, selling more than 130 million copies worldwide, before her tragic death in 1987. In a press statement by Bernard Regnauld-Fabre, the French Ambassador to Bahrain, he said, “We welcome the news that the world premiere of Dalida will take place here in Bahrain during So French Week.” So French Week is an annual week-long celebration of French culture, held by the French Embassy in Bahrain, a tradition which started in 2013.

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